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Full text of "Medic : the 1969 yearbook of the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital"

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THE HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE AND 



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HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA 




"Is it not better to live in revolution than to live in dead times? If there 
is any period one would desire to be born in, is it not the age of revolu- 
tion, when the old and the new stand side by side and admit of being 
compared?" RALPH WALDO EMERSON 









CONTENTS 

Introduction 4 

Dedication 12 

Administration 14 

Hahnemann Heritage 24 

Faculty 30 

Organizations 70 

Candids 78 

Underclassmen 92 

Class of 1969 108 

Advertisements 209 

Acknowledgements 231 

Epilogue 232 

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DEDICATION 








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For the teacher, there are very few opportunities 
to be sure that the students accept and appreci- 
ate the effort which he makes. The pleasure be- 
comes greater since your class has taken on a 
special meaning for me. I have come to know 
many members of the class personally while help- 
ing them with career choices and a multitude of 
other problems. As a result, I feel that a kinship 
and friendship has developed in many different 
ways. 



You are about to begin your careers in medicine 
and to attempt to apply the ideas, concepts, tech- 
niques, skills, and attitudes which you have ac- 
quired during the past four years. I believe that 
you are well prepared to deal with the myriad 
problems of medicine that will confront you. It is 



in the area of the art of medicine and in the de- 
velopment of your personal medical philosophy 
and integrity towards patients that you will con- 
stantly find yourself revising, amending, and al- 
tering your feelings and attitudes. Medicine will 
provide you with many opportunities to serve 
suffering human beings, to relieve pain and 
misery. You will often find your endurance taxed 
and your tolerance stretched. The conflict be- 
tween selflessness and selfishness will oft-times 
make decision-making an extremely arduous 
task. The struggle between your personal needs 
and the needs of your patients will be difficult to 
resolve. Learning to exercise patience, interest, 
concern, feeling, and caring in the face of har- 
assment, overwork, crises, suffering, and death 
will be the ultimate test of your ability as a total 
physician caring for the total patient. 




You have a unique opportunity as you enter this 
profession to combine the ideas and attitudes of 
your teachers with those individual ingredients of 
your own selves which will help you to fulfill the 
calling of medicine in your own special fashion. 
At the same time, you are entering this profession 
when the world is on the brink of even greater 
technological, philosophical, and sociological 
change. You are not only a citizen of your town, 
or member of the medical profession, but you are 
citizens of the world. In the exciting times that 
are to come, your contribution to the ever ex- 
panding and changing world we live in should be 
a significant one. The rapidity of change, the un- 
limited opportunities that are before you make it 
necessary for you to remain ever-watchful of what 
is going on around you and ever alert to the new, 
different, special, even the impossible. 

I wish to express my deep appreciation to every 
member of the class of 1969 for the great honor 
you have bestowed upon me. 

I look forward to hearing of your many successes 
in the coming years, of the honor that you will 
bring to Hahnemann, and the pleasure that we, 
your teachers, will feel in knowing that we have 
contributed in some small part to your develop- 
ment as physicians. 




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Paul Jay Fink, M.D. 




DMINISTRATION 







Joseph R. DiPalma, M.D. 



DEAN 




Dear Doctor: 

Now that the real trauma of four years of medical 
education is over, you may feel that any further 
words from your old teacher and advisor are 
redundant. Undoubtedly you are right, and I 
would not blame you for turning a deaf ear. The 
rapid pace of social change and almost immedi- 
ate obsolescence of knowledge lends credence 
to your attitude. 

Yet, let me try to give you some parting words 
that may inspire some modicum of confidence in 
a moment of doubt. Have you ever pondered on 
why the profession of medicine commands re- 
spect? Is it really because the physician is a 
person who has memorized ten million facts and 
knows how to cope with a variety of medical situ- 
ations? To a certain extent the answer must be 
positive. However, the ordinary diagnosis and 
therapy of disease is less mysterious to the com- 
mon man than the workings of his television or 
automobile. If this were the total competence of 
the physician, then he must be considered to be a 
technician, rather high class, but still a technician. 

The true esteem for the doctor by the public re- 
sides in his ability to render sound judgements 
on matters which concern the lives of men. It is 
in this respect that he vies with the other great 
professions: the law and the clergy. Therefore, if 
you would be among the foremost of your breed, 
ever cherish and guard the ability to make judge- 





ments. Attain and maintain that maturity of mind, 
that surety of spirit, and that sense of culture 
which together can guarantee the soundness of a 
critical mind. Never be so busy, so devoted to 
your trade, as to neglect the study in depth of 
man as a human in his expression in the arts, in 
history, in religion, and in philosophy. Man is not 
merely an ingenious assembly of plumbing which 
may be patched and transplanted. Man is man 
because he is creative, and his creations are 
more important to him than life itself. Man is the 
only animal I know of that regularly finds means 
of killing himself to attain peace of mind. 

In this parting, then, I am not telling you simply 
to be ever a student. Rather more, be a humanist 
so that you may contribute wise judgements in 
the social upheaval which now faces us and in 
those which are sure to erupt even more in the 
near future. With all good wishes. 

Most sincerely yours, 



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17 




PRESIDENT 



To the Members of the Graduating Class: 



server of 

the small world he saw concluded that there is 
nothing so constant as the phenomenon of 
change. And now, as never before, the human 
experience daily testifies to his wisdom. 

What he could not have foreseen, of course, is 
the acceleration of the pace of our change — our 
bane or blessing, depending largely, I suspect, 
on one's age. We are privileged or condemned to 
witness the interment of the "eternal verities," 
and in the space of a generation we have seen 
major alterations in valuations of such basic hu- 
man enterprises as religion, the arts, and moral- 
ity. These changes are profound, and they are 
probably irreversible. But one aspect of man's 
nature appears not to have changed — his impera- 
tive to search for facts. While the imperative to 
question has not changed, the increasing rate of 
discovery has made many changes possible or 
inevitable. 

We can, if we choose, blast every vestige of life 
on the earth into total oblivion. On the other 
hand, it is possible to control the population so 
that we will not eventually stand shoulder to 
shoulder on the earth's land. 

It is possible to save life and to make that life- 
more productive and happier than ever before. 
There is, even the troublous prospect that we 



Charles S. Cameron, M.D. 



may soon be able to influence genetic forces so 
as to produce the kinds of people we decide we 
need, if such decisions were ever possible. 

As you now leave the formal preparation for your 
life's work, I am suggesting that you reflect, now 
and then, on your own special role in structuring 
the era of social evolution. We all now have a 
voice in this new phase of evolution as con- 
trasted with eons of biological evolution in which 
the decisions were not ours. In this scheme of 
social evolution, doctors of medicine can and 
must chart the course. You are knowledgeable in 
the vast field of biological science and you know 
the needs of the human spirit as few men do. 

In you are blended these two fundamentals of the 
human experience — the instinct to understand 
and control the material aspects of living, and 
the deep, pervading, less tangible conviction of 
the need to see a brother in every fellow-traveler 
on the cosmic odyssey. I beg you to strive pur- 
posefully to cultivate these great powers which 
are yours, and to become activists in the abso- 
lutely essential crusade to improve human rela- 
tionships as well as the health of humans. They 
are hardly inseparable any more. 

For each of you, I most sincerely wish long and 
robust years, filled with the inner rewards which 



Sincerely yours, 



ASSOCIATE DEAN 






Hugh D. Bennett, M.D. 

To My Friends and Colleagues of the Class of 1969 



of change. In four short years you can recall 
physical change: The Klahr Auditorium, the old 
library, the Elkins Building, the Nursing School, 
the Schaff Building, the Hotel Philadelphia, the 
16th Street Annex Building, the Feinstein Clinic, 
the accident ward, the 18th Floor, and finally the 
demolition of the old college buildings. 

In these same short years, you have seen aca- 
demic growth: the honor code, the first elective 
programs and their growth, the first psychiatric 
clerkships, teaching physical diagnosis to fresh- 
men, affiliation with Fitzgerald Mercy, Chester, 
Harrisburg Polyclinic, Magee, re-organization at 
PGH, establishment of Community Medicine De- 
partment, Clinical Science Course, and the birth 
of a new curriculum. 

You have watched vast social changes occur in 
medicine: Medicare, Mental Health Programs, 
Regional Medical Programs, Pennsycare, Pedi- 
care, Health Professions loans and scholarships, 
SHO, re-birth of SAMA, emergence of specialists 
as a majority among medical practioners, and the 
virtual elimination of rotating internships in medi- 
cal school hospitals. 

In this same time, much of what you learned in 
basic science has become obsolete; and some of 
what you learned in clinical medicine was al- 




ready obsolete at the time you learned it, despite 
the best efforts of the faculty to stay abreast of 
the scientific explosion. 

In the face of such change what, then, can you 
take from Hahnemann that is real and lasting? To 
start with, you have an honored diploma which 
permits you to progress further in your studies. 
With the National Boards, you will have attained 
essential licensure and the privilege of practicing 
medicine. 

I believe that you have been provided a good 
base from which you can launch yourself into the 
perpetual task of updating and expanding your 
knowledge. I trust that you have attained effi- 
cient habits of study. I pray that you have learned 
the inestimable value of each human being and 
have dedicated yourself to the preservation and 
enrichment of life. I have watched you develop 
the skills of medicine to a high degree. I sense 
you have learned that essential mixture of confi- 
dence and humility so necessary in the physician. 

Lastly, you take with you the human examples 
which you have encountered and the friendships 
which you have made. If you take with you only 
these things, then the years at Hahnemann were 
worthwhile and your success as a physician is 
assured. My congratulations on your accomplish- 
ments. 



Sincerely yours, 




THE ESTABLISHMENT 



ROBERT H. HOLMES, M.D., Director of Medical Affairs 




CARL C. FISCHER, M.D., Hospital Council 

LEROY B. SCOTT, M.A., Registrar 




20 




LUCY F. COOKE, B.S., Librarian 





GERALD R. HEJDUK, M.A.. Assistant Dean 



CHARLES S. PAXTON, JR., B.S., Administrator 



ISBtr 



1848 




1969 




ERNEST T. LEISS. JR., B.S.. 
Executive Secretary of the Alumni Association 

MARGE CARMOSIN, Office of Public Relations 




GAL FRIDAYS 





'm ready for the Sengstaken tube." 



"All 99 seniors are black listed. 




■ 




'Sorry, I'm busy tonight. 




"They're sure noisy today ... did I say today?' 

22 




"STAT homeopathic consult, page Dr. Bennett. 





'He wants enough books to reach the lightbulb in his room. 




"Good morning . . . are you up . . . are you sure 
are you sure you're sure . . . I'll call you back . . ." 




"No money, no books!' 




Dr. Gonella, who's he?' 




"No, Kellow was kicked upstairs to Jefferson.' 



'For you, boobie, anything. 



■ 



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I. Hahnemann Hospital 2. Bobst Building 3. Medical College Building 4. Klahr Building 5. Nurses' Residence and Class- 
room Building 6. Ambulatory Patient Services 7. Addition to the Hospital 



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HAHNEMANN 
HERITAGE 



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Samuel Hahnemann 
1755-1843 






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Samuel Christian Friedrich Hahnemann, in 1790, while trans- 
lating Cullen's Materia Medica, attempted to verify the action 
of cinchona bark by trying it on himself; the drug produced 
exactly the same symptoms of intermittent fever for which it 
was prescribed. Hahnemann spent the following years of his 
life experimenting with the action of drugs on healthy human 
beings and applying his findings to certain of the sick. Day by 
day in his medical practice, he became more and more con- 
vinced that he was on the verge of a new therapeutic law. 

Born in 1755 in Meissen, Germany, Hahnemann had received 
his medical education at Leipsic and Erlangen; even in his 
student days, he was dissatisfied with the doctrine of his pro- 
fessors. His early experiences in medical practice confirmed 
his mistrust in the prevailing methods of treatment based on 
the assumption that disease was a force which must be op- 
posed by an equal or even greater force. Copious blood let- 
ting, violent purging, induced vomitting, laborious prescrip- 
tions with a dozen or more ingredients, and corporeal punish- 
ment of the insane were all common practices. 

In 1810, after years of testing for the definitive action of 
drugs, Hahnemann published the ORGANON, in which he 
termed his new method of treating disease — Homeopathy, fol- 
lowing the fundamental law: "Similia similibus curentur." He 
proposed that the body has naturally endowed powers of 
combatting disease and that the objective of treatment should 
be to stimulate these natural mechanisms. He inveighed 
against assaulting an already depleted organism and pre- 
scribed instead single remedies in small doses, carefully se- 
lected after painstaking inventory of the patient's symptoms 
and physical findings. 

Hahnemann enjoyed the reputation of being one of the fore- 
most scholars and physicians in all of Germany. Despite great 
opposition to his revolutionary theory, he was able to obtain a 
license to teach medicine at the University of Leipsic. There 
soon gathered about him a circle of enthusiasts, and Home- 
opathy became a distinct and separate discipline of medicine. 



History of Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital 




HOMEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA 
1848 



The introduction of homeopathy to the United States occurred 
in 1825 when Dr. Hans Burch Gram settled in New York City. 
The first dose of homeopathic medication to be prescribed in 
Pennsylvania was administered on July 24, 1828 by Dr. Henry 
Detwiller of Hellertown; a baffling case of retarded menstrua- 
tion with severe colic was effectively treated by Pulsatilla. In 
1829, an epidemic of dysentery was controlled so success- 
fully by the new system, that many allopathic physicians in the 
counties of Lehigh and Northampton began to embrace 
homeopathy wholeheartedly. 

On April 10, 1825, the North American Academy of the Homeo- 
pathic Healing Art was founded in Allentown. The faculty con- 
sisted of Drs. Hering, Romig, Proeses, Wesselhoeft, Detwiller, 
Freytag, and Pulte. The course of instruction extended from 
November to August. The following subjects were taught: 
physical examination, semeiotics, pharmacodynamics, thera- 
peutics, botany, pathology, physiology, anatomy, zoology, sur- 
gery, midwifery, diseases of women and children, medical 
jurisprudence, phytology, physics, mineralogy, chemistry, ge- 
ology, astronomy, mathematics, and the history of medicine. 
Candidates for diplomas were required to pass a Colloquium, 
to present a Curriculum Vitae, and to write a dissertation on 
some medical subject. The academy, however, was short- 
lived; the main problem was giving medical instruction en- 
tirely in the German language, and the lack of funds proved 
an insurmountable obstacle. 



Early in February 1848, Drs. Constantine Hering, Jacob Jeanes, and Walter Williamson 
met and decided to apply to the Pennsylvania Legislature, then in session, for a medical 
school charter. It was the desire of these men to found a medical school where students 
who desired to learn the practice of homeopathy might acquire such knowledge system- 
atically, and not as had been the custom, by serving a haphazard apprenticeship. The 
charter was granted; and on April 8, 1848, the Homeopathic College of Pennsylvania was 
incorporated. 

A building was leased at 229 Arch Street, a faculty of nine professors appointed; and on 
Monday evening, October 16, 1848, the opening session of the old college was held. The 
first year found fifteen students paying the $100 course fee, the $10 anatomy fee, and the 
$15 graduation fee to attend classes. The year terminated with commencement exercises 
in Music Fund Hall, at which six doctors were graduated. 

The success of the first session demonstrated that more adequate facilities would be 
necessary if the school were to prosper and grow. During the summer of 1849, a search 
was made for larger quarters. The opening lectures of the second session were held in 
the building formerly occupied by the Pennsylvania College of Medicine on Filbert Street 
between 11th and 12th Streets. Additions were made to the faculty; and at the second 
commencement, twenty students were graduated. 

From the inception of the college, a dispensary for the practical instruction of students 
had been an integral part. In 1850, the Court of Common Pleas for Philadelphia County 
granted a charter to the Homeopathic Hospital of Pennsylvania, which was erected on 




HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL 1887 



Chestnut Street and opened in 1852. Two years later, the hos- 
pital was forced to close its doors for want of support; and its 
property was turned over to the Soldier's Hospital during the 
War of the Rebellion. 

Many efforts to organize a new hospital failed until 1862, 
when a women's association for the management of a hospital 
was formed. These able ladies started a hospital in the rear of 
the college building for wounded and sick soldiers. After the 
war, this hospital likewise closed its doors. 

Financial difficulties were partially resolved by making the 
college a stock corporation. This move, however, allowed one 
member of the faculty, Dr. Lippe, to become majority stock- 
holder. In 1867, a serious schism occurred in the college 
when Dr. Lippe arbitrarily abolished the Chair of Special Pa- 
thology and Diagnostics. The majority stockholder contended 
that such instruction was unnecessary for the homeopathic 
physician, whose therapeutic guide was a symptom totality. In 
protest, Dr. Constantine Hering resigned from his lectureship, 
believing that the old college was no longer serving its pur- 
pose as a school where students might acquire a homeo- 
pathic education as part of a well-rounded medical course. 




HOMEOPATHIC HOSPITAL OF PENNSYLVANIA 1852 



Dr. Hering was able to secure the charter of the Washington Medical College, which had 
never held classes, and to have the name changed to the Hahnemann Medical College of 
Philadelphia. The new college began classes on October 13, 1867 at 1307 Chestnut 
Street. During the session 1868-1869, relations between the rwo rival schools were any- 
thing but cordial. Nevertheless, most of the faculty of the old college were in sympathy 
with Dr. Hering and worked out a plan for union of the two medical schools. Dr. Lippe 
was convinced by his colleagues to sell his stock to Dr. Guernsey, who was acting incog- 
nito as agent for Dr. Hering. By act of the Pennsylvania Legislature on April 2, 1869, the 
two colleges were legally merged with all rights and privileges of a university. It was 
decided that the Hahnemann name should be retained as a tribute to the founder of 
homeopathy. 

In the late 1860's, a name appeared in the Hahnemann catalogue, where it would remain 
for over half a century — Dr. Rufus B. Weaver, Professor of Anatomy. Dr. Weaver achieved 
national prominence by winning a Gold Medal at the Columbian Exposition for his re- 
markable dissection of the entire cerebrospinal nervous system. 

The need for clinical material and increased facilities led the faculty to hold a fair in 
Horticultural Hall, which netted the unexpectedly large sum of $17,000. In 1870, a five- 
story hospital was erected on Cuthbert Street. Contention then arose, centering around 
desire of the hospital to remain separate from the college and the wish of the college 
faculty to build an amphitheater for adequate clinical instruction. 

By 1880, the contention between college and hospital had become acute; the facilities 
and equipment of both were becoming inadequate and obsolete. Largely through the 
generosity of the faculty, the sum of $103,666.67 was paid for a piece of ground lying 
between Broad and 15th Streets above Race Street. Here the work of erecting a new 
hospital and college was begun in the fall of 1884. In 1886, the college was dedicated; 
and in 1890, a 150 bed hospital was opened. The corporate title of "The Hahnemann 
Medical College and Hospital of Philadelphia" was adopted and is still in use today. 



HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 1886 





HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 1900 



The course of medical instruction originally was ungraded and covered two academic 
years. During the session 1869-1870, a three-year course was made optional. In 1886, a 
three-year graded course was required for graduation. A four-year graded course was 
first offered in 1890 and then made obligatory with the academic year of 1894-1895. In 
1906, the office of dean was assumed by Dr. Herbert Northrup, a renowned surgeon and 
member of the Class of 1889. Dr. W. B. Van Lennep, Professor of Surgery, acceded to the 
position in 1910 and was instrumental in raising the academic standards to those required 
of a university teaching hospital. 




HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL 1929 



In 1913, in order to prepare students for admission to the medical college, Hahnemann 
established a College of Science. A one-year premedical course was offered, which was 
expanded to two years in 1917. The College of Science continued in operation until 1929 
when it was abandoned, largely because hundreds of students who had completed the 
premedical training applied for matriculation in the medical college. For more than forty 
years, the hospital and college had contributed their share to the healing of the sick. Just 
as they had done in the Civil War, Hahnemann graduates and faculty ministered to the 
needs of the military during World War I. Improvements were made as time passed, but 
eventually the institution once again began to feel the twinges of growing pains. Negotia- 
tions and more negotiations were conducted with the usual number of setbacks; but 
finally, the college building on North Broad Street was torn down in 1928 to make way for 
a modern, nineteen-story, 600 bed hospital. The college moved into the hospital building 
on North 15th Street, where courses were conducted until 1938 when the structure was 
renovated and partially replaced by a new seven-story wing containing the Klahr Audito- 
rium, lecture halls, and laboratory facilities. 

During^the early 1930's, Hahnemann was put on probation as a Class 
A medical college; too rapid expansion in size and failure to keep 
pace with newer methods of clinical training resulted in this tempo- 
rary status. Instruction in the homeopathic disciplines was gradually 
phased out of the curriculum; the last remaining vestige, an elective 
course in the history of homeopathic practice, was dropped from the 
catalogue in the early 1950's. The principle of full-time faculty was 
promoted in both the preclinical and clinical departments. Research 
programs were augmented. Old courses were updated, and new 
courses were added to the curriculum. 

Women were first admitted as students in the fall of 1941. During 
World War II, classes were enlarged slightly to provide additional 
medical personnel to serve the needs of a nation at war; courses 
were conducted on a year-round basis. Immediately following the con- 
flict, the corporation acquired the Northwest Grammar School on 
Race Street, completely renovated the structure, and converted it into 
a Clinic Building for diagnosis and treatment of ambulatory patients. 
Dr. Charles L Brown became dean in 1946, succeeding Dr. William A. 
Pearson, who had held the office for thirty years. For the next nine 
years, Dr. Brown guided the reorganization of faculty and curriculum. 

The Nursing School of Hahnemann Hospital dates from 1890. The 
school was located at 15th and Vine Streets until 1963, when a new 
Nurses' Residence and Classroom Building was completed. The 
seven-story structure provides living quarters for 185 student nurses, 
as well as meeting rooms, classrooms, and a library. 



28 



Dr. Charles S. Cameron, a member of the Class of 1935, was appointed dean in 1956 and 
president in 1961. Dr. Cameron has led the institution through more than a decade of 
development to meet the growing complexities of urban health service. His successor as 
dean, Dr. William F. Kellow, continued vigorous leadership in faculty affairs until 1967, 
when Dr. Joseph R. DiPalma, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pharmacol- 
ogy, became acting dean. Dr. DiPalma, named dean in 1968, is presently guiding the 
college through its most dynamic period of growth and reorganization. Since June 1962, 
the administration has been ably assisted by Dr. Hugh D. Bennett, Associate Dean, who 
has been active in student affairs and the conversion of a classical medical school 
curriculum into a core basic science and multiple track program. 

In 1963, various collections of textbooks and periodicals were consolidated, indexed, and 
moved into a central library now occupying the old Klahr Auditorium. In 1966, the corpo- 
ration acquired Eckels College of Mortuary Science on North 16th Street and relocated 
the basic science laboratories and book store. The Myer Feinstein Polyclinic, containing 
one of the largest radiation therapy units in the United States, opened in January 1967. In 
June 1967, the Elmer Holmes Bobst Institute of Clinical Research was dedicated; the 
sixteen-story structure replaces the Elkins Building and contains general and special sur- 
gical suites in addition to research laboratories. During the summer of 1967, a Psychiatric 
Day Hospital was opened at the Hotel Philadelphia. The Cardiovascular Research Insti- 
tute, which has pioneered in the medical and surgical treatment of vascular disease, will 
be relocated in the addition to the hospital. Two floors of the hospital have recently been 
renovated to accomodate the new psychiatric and pediatric units. 

At the commencement of 1921, the degree of Bachelor of Science and higher degrees 
were first conferred. The Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences offers integrated 
programs of formal courses, teaching experience, and research training leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The School of Radiologic Tech- 
nology grants fourteen certificates annually, and the School of Medical Technology 
offers training leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. 

During the summer of 1968, the door of the 80 year old college building on North 15th 
Street was locked for the last time; the structure is now being demolished, and in its 
place will rise a nineteen-story tower and eight-story wing. The new medical college 
building, costing over $32,000,000, will contain a library of 70,000 volumes and 1,200 
periodicals, three lecture halls, a 700 seat auditorium, 18 multi-purpose teaching labora- 
tories, and many research laboratories. Other buildings planned for the future include 
ambulatory patient services, a new teaching hospital, and housing facilities for house 
staff and students. 

Today the 7,700th Doctor of Medicine is graduating from The Hahnemann Medical Col- 
lege and Hospital of Philadelphia. Over 600 faculty members in thirteen departments 
have taken part in his medical education. He joins over 4,000 living alumni in the care 
and treatment of the sick. 



The Hahnemann Heritage lives on. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
June 3, 1969 



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HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 1972 






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FACULTY 





GAUDEAMUS 

As we pass through our four years at Hahne- 
mann, a few of our professors linger as fond 
memories in the deep corridors of our minds. The 
Class of 1969 wishes to express its appreciation 
to these ten faculty members for their dedication 
to academic medicine, for their special interest in 
student affairs, and for their loyalty to Hahne- 
mann. The quality of medical education can only 
be enhanced as long as mentors such as these 
continue to instruct future physicians. 






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WILBUR W. OAKS, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine 
WILLIAM LIKOFF, M.D., Professor of Medicine 





JEWELL L. OSTERHOLM, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery 
RALPH A. SHAW, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine 





RY JANE C. SHOWERS, Ph.D. 
lociate Professor of Anatomy 




MARSHALL KLAVAN, M.D., Associate 
Professor of Obstetrics-Gynecology 



(Saudeamus igitur 
iMJcnes dum sumus 
post iucundam iubcntutcm 
post molestam senectutcm 
nos habcbit humus 




G. JOHN DIGREGORIO, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology 



'VRLES W. SWARTZ, M.D., 
istant Professor of Medicine 



GERALD M. FENDRICK, M.D., 
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 




MARTIN BAREN. M.D.. Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 



PRECLINICAL YEARS 



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Each year in early September, one hundred odd stu- 
dents begin the four years of training required for an 
M.D. degree. First of the scheduled 6,000 hours is tra- 
ditionally devoted to gross anatomy, histology, 
neuroanatomy, embryology, and genetics. The 
cadaver, the slides, the sections, Gray's Anatomy, 
Grant's Atlas, Arey's Embryology ... it just isn't pos- 
sible for one human mind to absorb all those facts. 
But possible or not, the triangle of auscultation, the 
organ of Zuckerkandl, the circle of Willis, the canal of 
Nuck, the dance of the chromosomes all make perma- 
nent engrams in our cortical computers. The unending 
series of lectures begin: "Through the Looking 
Glass," by Dr. Amenta; "Womb to Tomb," by Dr. 
Augustine; "Honeymoon on the Isle of Risle," by Dr. 
Showers; and "Mnemonic Plague," by Dr. Van Dyke. 
Your loved ones shun you, no one sits near you on the 
subway, party invitations grow scarce, but the odor of 
formaldehyde lingers on; rumor has it that the smell 
just wears off in a few years. A slide is a slide, but a 
good microscope is a thing of joy forever ... I wonder 
how much I can sell it for in a couple of years . . . No, 
you may not take the calvarium home for an ashtray 
. . . That anomaly, why they would never ask that in 
the quiz! Old Opticians Often Try Touching And Feel- 
ing A Girl's . . . maybe anatomy isn't such a dry sub- 
ject after all. 




DR. JOHN H. VAN DYKE "In keeping with the new 
curriculum, slides of the perineum will be omitted." 



ANATOMY 



DR. BERWIND N. KAUFMANN "This is one of my more successful 
genetic experiments." 




DR. PETER S. AMENTA "You want to know why the Glee Club 
doesn't have to take the final?" 









fJ—y -a 






DR. JEAN MacCREIGHT "When I was a girl, they were still 
trephining skulls to let out the evil spirits." 




J 




DR. KATHRYN E. FUSCALDO "You definitely qualify 
for an idiogram." 



"Mister Igor to you.' 




BIOCHEMISTRY 




DR. GERT M. JACOBSOHN "At last I'm not going to 
appear in the yearbook as a soap salesman." 



Enzyme Kinetics, ATP, protein metabolism, DNA, 
furry bunny rabbits, albino rats — diagnosing and 
treating patients is a long way off. Laboratory 
experiments take on new meaning . . . ouch! . . . 
stick my antecubital vein, not my biceps tendon 
. . . what is that? ... a small hematoma, not a 
thing to worry about. The lectures continue: "I 
Remember Michaelis and Menten," by Dr. 
Oesper; "Trickery, Chicanery, and Examination 
Theory," by Dr. Schultz; "The Power of Positive 
Nitrogen Balance," by Dr. Boyd; "Danish Opera- 
tion or Hormone Supplement," by Dr. Jacobsohn; 
"Metaphysical Machinations of Mitochondria," by 
Dr. Eichel; "Happy Endings for Incomplete Beta 
Functions," by Dr. Koser; "Kwashiorkor or What- 
ever Happened to Baby Jane?" by Dr. Alper; 
"Ex Nihilo Synthesis of Purines and Pyrimidines," 
by Dr. Alexander; and "Phantasmagoria of Acid- 
Base Balance," by Dr. Defrates. The Kreb Cycle, 
the Corey Cycle, the Urea Cycle, the Bicycle . . . 
no wonder my head is spinning . . . Relax, you 
only have porphyrin anabolism and lipid catabo- 
lism left to learn ... and there's a whole week 
before the final exam. 




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DR. JULIUS SCHULTZ "The questions aren't devious enough to put in the 
exam." 




DR. JOHN M. BOYD "Retired? Not at all, I'm conducting independent 
research in ethanol metaboli sm." 




DR. HERBERT J. EICHEL "I can always get a job with the micro 
department." 




DR. JAMES K. ALEXANDER "I counted 95 students asleep during 
my last lecture." 




DR. JOSEPH S. DE FRATES "Silver Fox? No, I am the Velvet 
Harpoon!" 



A 








DR. PETER OESPER "Very interesting, but that enzyme only 
exists in the text book." 

DR. THOMAS M. DEVLIN "They were looking for someone 
to put their Krebs Cycle in order." 




^miVCmA 



; 



PHYSIOLOGY 



Rheobase, chronaxe, tonus, osmosis, action potential, 
conduction velocity, synaptic transmission, summation 
of vectors — physiology-a-go-go was off to a flying 
start with Drs. Scott and Reed. Kymograph smoked, 
galvenometer plugged in, electrodes placed, lever at- 
tached, cannula inserted, ether cone ready . . . oops! 
... no other dogs, huh? . . . well, I guess we can fill 
in the data. The little red handbook of physiology 
gems . . . mercury in your shoes . . . weekly quizzes 
. . . Drs. McElroy, Appert, Spitzer, mighty men of sci- 
ence . . . long may they experiment . . . Maybe if they 
change the name . . . The Department of Physiology 
and Biophysics . . . sounds distinguished . . . and a 
new chairman . . . 





DR. EVANGELOS T. ANGELAKOS "They were looking for some- 
one with good cerebral perfusion." 



DR. WILLIAM T. McELROY "The experiment ... oh 
what merriment!" 




DR. HUBERT APPERT "Just 
remember that a pithed frog 
can still pith." 



DR. ANN AMBROMOVAGE 
"Gerald K. stood me up." 



DR. JOHN C. SCOTT "Retired? No, 
I'm helping Dr. Boyd." 




DR. AARON A. BECHTEL "Respiratory physiology is a 
gas." 



'1:05 P.M., and you need another cat already." 





MICROBIOLOGY 



The second year is rapidly in gear; no time to 
notice that a few classmates have failed to mus- 
ter. Microbiology offers a personal introduction 
to the parasites, opportunists, and invaders 
which cause human disease. Learning the tech- 
nique of staining is quite informative . . . fingers 
are Gram positive, clothes are Gram negative, 
and pine needles are acid fast. Insect vectors 
were stressed . . . the housefly, the fruit fly, the 
black fly, the tsetse fly, the Spanish fly, and the 
bar fly ... Seminars on Vincent's Angina were 
held at Abe's Luncheonette. 

Amadeo, Bacillus, Coccus, Dermatophytoses, 
Echovirus, Flagella, Glanders, Hammell, Intestinal 
fluke, Jungle rot, Kala-azar, LGV, Moat, Neis- 
seria, Opsonins, Phage, Q fever, Rickettsia, 
Stelos, Treponema, Urushiol, Vaccine, Weidanz, 
Xenograft, Yaws, Zoster . . . every course has its 
own version of the alphabet. The water in Phila- 
delphia is a meal in itself . . . the spirochetes 
march in four abreast . . . never kiss on the lips 
. . . hoof and mouth disease. 




t 




DR. AMEDEO BONDI, JR. "A toast to my son, the real doctor in the family. 

DR. WILLIAM P. WEIDANZ "It's great to be misunder- 
stood." 



■3^ 



*/TW*rtt 



DR. JAY M. HAMMELL "You don't use your finger, that's what the loop is 
for." 




DR. PETER STELOS "It's a good 
beer, not a great beer, but . . ." 






DR. ALBERT G. MOAT "Hugh Heffner is my idol 



PHARMACOLOGY 

The average student will forget the action of 
quinidine, but undoubtedly remember the effects 
of selenium on cattle in Wyoming . . . you ought 
to see at least one case of the blind staggers in 
the next twenty years . . . Laboratory in phar- 
macology is the time to smear burnt cork on your 
forehead, make corny jokes about Ash Wednes- 
day, and take amphetamine to keep from falling 
asleep. There are two approaches to the course. 
The first is to read the text, which is clearly im- 
possible. The second is to stick to lecture notes, 
which is clearly disastrous. When all else fails, 
your conference leader will give you the chart 
summarizing the entire course which can be 
spread out on any 9' x 12' room. 
Even if you can't remember the Latin for your 
prescription, just keep in mind that there is no 
such thing as 150 cc bottle. 





DR. JOSEPH R. DIPALMA "Now dat I loined 
youse guys drugs, I can take over as the 
Big Boy." 



DR. BENJAMIN CALESNICK "Even if you don't survive the 
experiment, you still get the $7.50." 



44 




DR. G. JOHN DIGREGORIO "What do you mean it's 
my turn to clean the cages." 




DR. WARREN CHERNICK ... da new boss 







2l«ie&oli}. Brf«m. fjmplxr. 3mfr4. Rop ufn Ommtl"* S$tr*tn ©T«»». 



DR. EDWARD I. CIACCIO "Six liters, a new diuretic 
miracle!" 



45 



PATHOLOGY 



"My name is Joseph Imbriglia, M. Deity . . ." Four 
months of morbid anatomy has begun ... no 
chart, rhyme scheme, mnemonic, or diagram is 
overlooked in the attempt to learn all the disease 
entities which affect man . . . you quickly learn 
the concept of cortical saturation ... for every 
new fact you memorize, one old one is forgotten. 
The steady diet of nutmeg liver, chicken fat clot, 
strawberry gallbladder, current jelly thrombus, 
berry aneurysm continues . . . Several thousand 
pages and several thousand slides later, you are 
half way through the course . . . nothing to do now 
except prepare for the National Boards . . . 





DR. ALEXANDER NEDWICH "A veritable case of reactive 
hyperemia." 



DR. E. KARL KOIWAI "I don't see it. 





DR. THOMAS K. RATHMELL "I don't care what the Russians 
say; we invented Pathology." 



DR. JOHN M. DOLPHIN "I'm helping Dr. Boyd with 
his research." 



— 





DR. WILLIAM C. KASHATUS "How do I hate thee, let me count the 
ways . . ." 



DR. JOSEPH E. IMBRIGLIA "l-M-B-R-l-G-L-l-A ... the 'g' is silent 
as in bologna." 





DR. IRENA KOPROWSKA "Have I had my checkup? Hungarians 
only, please!" 



47 



CLINICAL YEARS 



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SURGERY 



While the pentose shunt, the branches of the vagus nerve, the march 
of the reflex figure, the myriad derivatives of digitalis, the sub- 
species of the scotochromogens, and the Pickwickian syndrome lived 
on in our memories, we finally began to enjoy the more leisurely 
aspects of clinical training: 7:00 A.M. rounds, scut work, night call, 
morbidity and mortality conferences, etc. . . . First scrub . . . second 
scrub . . . tenth scrub, all within the first half hour . . . did it right at 
last . . . first chance to assist . . . suture scissors . . . cut it on the knot 
. . . you frayed the thread . . . don't cut out the knot . . . cut just above 
the knot . . . not that long . . . leave a tail on this one ... no, too short 
. . . never mind, I'll cut it myself . . . SAVITZ'S LAW: There is abso- 
lutely no way to cut a suture correctly. 




DR. DEMETRIUS S. SARIS The Baron renewed my 
contract." 





DR. HARRY S. WEAVER, JR. "PERRLA, EOMI . . . 
that's all you have to know." 

DR. JOHN M. HOWARD "50% burns or not, 
just git'im up 'n feed'im, boy." 



"Procedure? No, they re watchinq Charlie throw a tantrum. 



DR. MORTON H. PERLMAN "Doesn't any- 
body need a surgeon?" 




DR. PETER PELLEGRINO "If 
he were a thoroughbred in 
his condition, we'd shoot 
him." 






DR. SIDNEY TOBIAS "Don't touch me, I'm STERILE!' 
DR. RICHARD M. LEHMAN Mr. Personality 






DR. ALBERTO ADAM "Anything Nichols can do, I can 
do better — including the Bovie." 




'Knit one, purl two 
50 





DR. ROBERT HANSEBOUT ". . . and then Dr. Wolferth 
smashed my radio." 




DR. DONALD A. NAGLE "Fired? You must be joking. 



DR. CHARLES SACKS "Did you say it was benign?' 








51 




V ,J 

DR. JEWELL L. OSTERHOLM "He can still 
say five words, huh? 'Who did this to 
me?' " 




DR. PAUL M. JAMES, JR. "Curse you, Red 
Baron!" 





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DR. HOWARD ZIEDMAN "Me, too; you got to be kidding. 






DR. AXEL K. OLJ 




DR. IVAN BARONOFSKY "All I did was fire a 
few guys." 



DR. CHARLES C. WOLFERTH, JR. "When I get up to that O.R., you'd better snap to 
attention." 




"Sponge count? No, I feel lucky today." 




DR. ALEXANDER E. PEARCE ". . . and if you 
still cant get the Foley in, punt." 




"Ole! !" 




DR. ROBERT BOWER "When in doubt, cut it 
out." 





DR. EDWARD D. COPPOLA "I haven't made a 
mistake since the last time I operated." 



MEDICINE 



DR. ALBERT N.- BREST "How to succeed in 
cardiology without really trying." 






DR. LEWIS C. MILLS and DR. RALPH A. SHAW "I told those dumb kids to buy that 
stock." 





DR. DEMETRIOS KIMBIRIS "They won't renew my 
malpractice insurance." 



54 



DR. ROBERT H. SELLER "Don't you ever call 
me RAPID ROBERT again." 



Diagnosis, Prognosis, Cure — the ancient trinity of 
medicine . . . the painful beginnings ... 2 page 
HPI's . . . asking all the questions in the little blue 
book for ROS's, PMH's dating prenatally, SH's 
including political views, FH's back to great 
grand parents, recording all negatives in PE's, 
and IMPRESSIONS with a differential diagnosis 
of every spurious finding . . . inspection, palpation, 
percussion, auscultation . . . slowly, ever so slowly, 
the skill, the art becomes ingrained, at least in 
most of us . . . true understanding of pathophysiol- 
ogy . . . first correct diagnosis . . . first crock . . . 
CODE 99 . . . managing fevers alone . . . thinking, 
investigating, deducing . . . evolution of confidence 
. . . writing orders . . . oneupmanship . . . sharing 
scut work . . . developing colleagues . . . M.D. 



>%»»»%%»»»»»»»%»»»»»%»»%»»»%♦»»' 






Covered with a Tasteless and Soluble Coating 

BEECHAM'Sj 

PILLS 

are a marvellous 

Antidote for Weak 

Stomach, 

SICK HEAD- 
ACHE, 

Impair. 
ed Diges- 
tion, Con- 
■tlpatlon. 
Disorder* 
ed Liver, 
etc. ; found J i 
also to be especially efficacious and remedial < i 
by FEMA1.K SUFFERERS. 
Ot all druggists. Price 25 cents a box. _ 
New York Depot, 365 Canal St. < t 

505 





DR. LESLIE NICHOLS 
rectals no hands?" 



'Who said I do my 



DR. CHARLES THOMPSON "My Hahnemann 
Med. Disc, will clue you in." 






DR. PAUL B. SOLNICK "Ready 



Set 



Blow." 




DR. STANLEY SPITZER "Well, that's the way 
Dan does it." 



i> 





DR. ALAN KELLERMAN "I knew 
Crest could do it." 



DR. VICTOR F. IACOCCA "I remain 
dubious." 



DR. JOSEPH GAMBESCIA "Seventeen girls! 
One more and I'll have my own golf course." 





DR. CHARLES SWARTZ "Waiting for Gaddo!' 



DR. GADDO ONESTI "ONESTI'S LAW: When 
the number of tubes exceeds the number of 
natural orifices, the patient is in deep trou- 
ble." 







DR. SIGMUND B. KAHN "My mother saw me 
on television." 




DR. ISADORE BRODSKY "How dare 
you question my opinion?" 




POZZONI'S 



is a delicate refreshing powder that will soften 3 
and refine the skin, and is not only a luxury but j 

a necessity in this climate. It makes the face i _,_ _, ,_. „.,. ,-. _,,-.._..-.,-, ,,. ,_...- ;_ :,,-♦ 

delicately smooth, giving it that transparent J DR. SHELDON R. BENDER A murmur IS JUSt 

clearness which is the great beauty of all natur- J . . !„„ _„__ « 

ally ane complexions. Kefuse all substitutes. 3 a murmur, but an opening snap 

Thegenuineis FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. 





DR. MORTON FUCHS "I won't mind the 
weather in Arizona." 



DR. WILLIAM LIKOFF "Of course, 
this is the Dr. Likoff." 



DR. LEONARD DREIFUS "But Mister Clean 
can't read an EKG." 



DR. JOHN H. DAVIE "My dear, D.O.M. does not stand for 
Doctor of Medicine 

57 






DR. LEON KAUFFMAN "Medical 
students are getting funnier look- 
ing everyday." 



DR. PATRICIA A. GERMON "The Blue 
Bloater rides again." 





DR. JOHN H. MOYER "You mean you've 
been looking for me?" 




GLUTEI N 

SUPPOSITORIES 



CURE 



CONSTIPATION 
AND PILES 



NUMBER 1 FOR ADULTS. 

NUMBER 2 FOR BABIES 

The surest, simplest, safest remedy on earth. No pur 
gatlves, no catnartics, no laxatives to destroy the stom 
ach, but strengthening, up-building, local nutrition. 



50 CENTS. 
Druggists. 

HEALTH 

FOOD 

CO. 



FREE BY MAIL. Sold by all 

61 Fifth Avenue, New York. 
199 Tremout Street, Boston. 
tilfZ Arch St., Philadelphia. 
1601 Wabash Ave., Chicago 



you what we're 

DR. HOBART A. REIMANN "What 
diseases do bedbugs carry?" 



PAMPHLETS MAILED FREE. 



DR. DANIEL MASON "And when her Blue 
Cross Blue Shield ran out, we didn't send her 
home; we helped her mortgage her house." 



BROWNS UABn, 
RESTORER 



rmrwws hair 





rum; 

mm 









-"A 



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v 



Before 



After 



A BALD STATEMENT. 






All you ever need— 

A 

Good 
Dentist 

and 




SOZ0D0NT 




flrcrere n 



Why? 



Because a good dentist and a good ' 
dentifrice are indispensable in the 
proper care of the teeth. 

A sample of Sozodont for three cents. I 
Address P. O. Box 247. New York City. 

OHDOM- 

— ■ llil-t 11^ 



DR. DONALD J. FISHMAN "Don't you have anything 
to make hair grow?" 



DR. VINCENT J. ZARRO "My personality is 
split between Community Medicine and 
Rheumetology." 




DR. PETER SIGMANN "What was I 
doing during the war?" 



SHIELD 

Yoaraett against all 
Imparities 

of ft* 



S, KIN 





▲gents, 
U7JPFF.LT 




DR. EDWIN POLISH "I'm starting a new jour- 
nal club — The Borborygmi." 



DR. ELLIOTT L. MANCALL "Next time we'll 
have to get the giant economy size roll." 



59 



PEDIATRICS 



From the first attempt to elicit a chief complaint out of a 
toddler to the last try to get a youngster to sit still long 
enough for a physical exam, the realization comes upon us 
that the world of the little people is quite different from the 
environment of the adult. All too quickly we found out why 
pediatricians wear bow ties . . . oochie, pouchie, pouchie, poo 
... is that anyway for a future physician to act . . . only if he 
wants to hear something in the thorax besides transmitted 
crying . . . and the inner satisfaction that comes with a URI 
from one of your more satisfied customers . . . finally, you are 
getting your money's worth out of your otoscope ... oh well, 
at least you found out what formula is neat, handy, pre- 
warmed, pre-mixed and wrapped in cute containers — 
mother's milk. 




DRS. ELEANOR SHAHEEN, MILTON GRAUB 
and the Circle of Friends 






'Where's the cervix?" 



DR. MARTIN BAREN The nicer Baron 



60 





"Arcus Senilis. 













DR. SUMNER R. ZIEGRA "You see it first at PGH." 








DR. GIULIO J. BARBERO "This is a 
disorder of elimination." 





DR. GERALD M. FENDRICK The Fuzz 



DR. DANIEL F. DOWNING "All 
murmurs are guilty until proven in- 
nocent." 





Every department should have one 



OBSTETRICS / GYNECOLOGY 



Despite many technological advances over many centuries and the 
onslaught of modern medicine, women go about begetting in the same 
way women did in biblical times. The concept of woman as a chronically 
constipated biped with leukorrhea and backache is certainly not advanced 
by the OB/GYN Department at Hahnemann. However, dyspareunia is cer- 
tainly better than no pareunia at all; and the primary indication for hyster- 
ectomy is the presence of a uterus. Nevertheless, the miracle of birth re- 
mains a miracle in spite of proper analgesia and sedation, sterile preps, 
and predelivery enemas. To participate in and put the final touches on the 
creation of a human life can only serve to further dedicate the future physi- 
cian to his station in life. 




%jt 





DR. DOMANIC I. PONTARELLI 
"Hope its a boy; the tips are 
great." 



DR. SEYMOUR STEIN "Yes, that's right, 
don't wait till you're married." 





DR. JAMES H. LEE "Senator Dirkson took 
elocution lessons from me." 



'Ready or not, here I come." 



62 




DR. GEORGE C. LEWIS, JR. "I am not a 
douche doctor." 



. 




DR. NEIL SILVERMAN "Get married 
in the morning; if it doesn't work 
out, you haven't shot the whole 
day.'' 




"Call Dr. Fink; we found a dentate vagina. 





DR. MARSHALL KLAVAN "Remember: a professional examination 
is done with two fingers." 



DR. BRUCE V. MACFADYEN "90 year old girl, 10 babies, post- 
menopausal bleeding . . ." 





DR. LARRY McGOWAN "Don't make 
mirth of the afterbirth." 

63 




Malcolm X-ray 




t n. 



DR. J. STAUFFER LEHMAN "Let's see, it is 
the anode that's negative, or is it the 
cathode?" 





DR. WELLAND F. SHORT "Pretty weak x-ray, just got through her clothes. 









* 




DR. KENNETH H. SOLL "Impression: there is definitive radiologic evidence 
of a beautiful fungating bronchogenic carcinoma." 



DR. GEORGE C. EVANS HAWAIIAN EYE 




RADIOLOGY 



Much has been done since last year to alleviate the crowded 
corridors, miniscule viewing rooms, lack of rapport between 
students and clerks, and poor scheduling of patients. Cer- 
tainly the staff is ever ready to teach interested students the 
finer points of the Ace of Spades Sign, Scottie Doggies, Lead 
Pipes, Honeycombs, and Napkin Rings. And in spite of every 
imaginable obstacle, the studies get done and are reported 
accurately. 



"Tell J.S.L I run this department. 





DR. LUTHER W. BRADY "Zap! ! You're sterile! 




M 




DR. MILLARD N. CROLL "Get up, that table is for x-rays." 



65 



PSYCHIATRY 



The Id, the Ego, the Superego — the modern trinity . . . 
suddenly all our regular habits, as well as our idiosyn- 
crasies, take on new meaning . . . drives, defense 
mechanisms, conscious, unconscious . . . why are you 
so hostile? . . . why do you ask? . . . why do you re- 
sent my asking? . . . Never before and never again do 
we ask ourselves why . . . don't lose your keys . . . it's 
the only way to tell the doctors from the patients . . . 
passive aggressive . . . schizophrenia . . . secondary 
gain . . . manic depressive . . . blocking . . . flight of 
ideas . . . flatness of affect ... la belle indifference 
. . . now you understand ... or do you? 




DR. MELWYN L. POSTERNACK "So what else should a nice Jew- 
ish boy who hates blood become?" 





hAf 



4* 




DR. HERMAN S. BELMONT "Children who are afraid of tall buildings often 
suffer from an edifice complex." 





DR. LINDLEY WINSTON "Mrs. Barr smokes Camels 
. . . very interesting." 



DR. PAUL J. 
Master's Test. 



FINK "They chose me because of my high score in the 




DR. MITCHELL DAVID "Oral fixations can be quite debilitating. 




DR. VAN BUREN O. HAMMETT "How do you like my topectomy?' 




DR. DON E. JOHNSON "You don't really see a hand writing 
on the blackboard." 






DR. FRANKLIN H. WEST "I'd be happy to take your case; 
first bring in your income tax return for analysis." 



DR. OSCAR R. WEINER "Mrs. Lincoln and I didn't realize anyone was 
looking through the two-way mirror." 



ANESTHESIOLOGY 



Passing gas may not be socially acceptable; but to an 
anesthesiologist, it is a way of life . . . 'Who was that 
masked man?' is a question often asked in the 
operating room ... Is there really someone else under 
the drapes besides the patient? . . . What is the blood 
pressure now? . . . better wake up the anesthetist . . . 
but with all the joking, when a surgeon has to perform 
an emergency laperotomy on an eighty year old pa- 
tient with cardiac arrhythmia and marginal renal func- 
tion, an anesthesiologist is a nice person to have 
around. 




DR. SETH M. FISHER "Rain or shine, we're always here; if it 
snows, forget it." 




DR. ALFRED I. CATENACCI "Local anesthesia? Sorry, not my 
line." 

"So that's what you do on your side of the sheet." 



68 







"I don't believe it, we're 
out of gas." 



'Did he say 10 gr. or 10 mg.? . . . I'll split the difference.' 



69 







ORGANIZATIONS 




CLASS BOOK COMMITTEE 



Ct.^-: 



■ I 



■ 









X* 



■ 






^m 



■H 



■ 



— 




JOYCE A. BOCKAR, Art Editor 




MEDIC 1969 




MARTIN H. SAVITZ, Editor-in-Chief 




■■■■■^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M 





EARL S. HERR, Business Manager 



DR. E. KARL KOIWAI, Faculty Advisor 
72 



RICHARD S. ROSE, Photography 
Editor 



IMPULSE 



This issue began the second year of a monthly student newspaper at 
Hahnemann. Impulse is sent by mail to all students and faculty and to 
interested alumni, house staff, and associates of the Hospital. The cur- 
rent circulation is 1,200 copies. 

In addition to reporting on current and future school events, Impulse 
offers a unique opportunity for members of the student body, as well as 
members of the faculty, to voice their opinions on a variety of medical 
subjects. Editorials, opposing views, photo essays, verse, cartoons, com- 
mittee reports, and calendar notices are all regular features. 

The funding of Impulse was provided this year by a grant of $1500 from 
the Merck Sharp & Dohme Postgraduate Program as a service to medical 
education. 

Dr. G. John DiGregorio was financial advisor, and Dr. Gerald M. Fendrick 
was literary advisor of Impulse this year. 

As scapegoat for the staff, Susan Rayna Savitz must bear the blame for 
the mistakes of others, especially the Chief. For her unflinching devotion to 
duty, the Editorial Staff has awarded her a free subscription. 




MA*t>V<£ 



B*Tc\ 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



MARTIN H SAVITZ 

DR. G. JOHN DIGREGORIO 
DR. GERALD M. FENDRICK 



JOYCE A. BOCKAR 
RODNEY A. WENRICH 
JEFFREY M. BELL 
MARTIN F. HAYES 
DENIS R. KING 
RICHARD S. ROSE 
EMORY ROBINSON 
SUSAN R. SAVITZ 



CHIEF 

EXCHEQUER 

CONSULT 

BLITHE SPIRIT 

EXEC 

COGITATOR 

FEATHERBEDDER 

MENTOR 

IMPRESSIONIST 

PRESBYTER 

SCAPEGOAT 



IMPULSE 



VOL.2 NO.1 



OCTOBER, 1968 



PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 





INSIDE THIS ISSUE 



"Tht Madicma Man Than and Nov.. " oaga ' 
tha Octob*' aduonai "Whtn I gat tha 

ImpulM." £>•»• 2. • protpactuS on Itudant 
Out! Clio- "Studanl Inftituta Maating." 

0*9* 3 'Studant Atfa'ft Committaa." 

0*9* 3 VtfSuS V« Vtr«ul.' 0*9* * 

"Sao.ua! to O'ltant Lmt«" "S H " 

0*9* 4 5. A budding studtnt movtmtnt at 
Hahnemann "Commctm on Black 

Adm.aions.' M«* 5.6.and 7 a 'toot on 
tha Nagro Studant and '«i"i 
"Mad'cal Mmutia." pagt 7. t« ona-ue*- 
mansh'P on roundl Pra*hman 

Onantation." oaga 8 a O'Ctca taaav on 
tha op«n>ng ExtrcWl o f tna v**r 
"Notaoia Evtnti.' oaga 10 



STUDENT INSTITUTE 



The Hahnemann Institute was originated by Dr. Walter Wil- 
liamson during the session of 1849-1850 for the purpose of 
acquiring unison in the minds of young men identified with 
the acquisition of knowledge in medicine. After many years 
and several transitions, the Student Institute now encom- 
passes a broad well-rounded extracurricular program of ac- 
tivities. 




Michael Swank President 

John D. Lucey Vice-President 

Martin R. Eichelberger Treasurer 

Michael Rudnick Secretary 



The Student Institute, elected by the student body, is charged 
with administering the student activities fee for the benefit of 
all the students. President Michael Swank presented the fol- 
lowing budget of $6,500 for the 1968-1969 session: 

Yearbook $3,500 

Senior Class 150 

Junior Class 150 

Blue and Gold Ball 450 

Spring Picnic 500 

Student-Faculty Cocktail Party 350 

Medical Minstrels 200 

Student Institute Dinners 250 

Sports 50 

Undergraduate Research Society 100 

Advertising 100 

Annual Lectureships 100 

H.U.W.A. Christmas Party 200 

Theatre Parties 350 

Miscellaneous 50 

In addition to its regular program, the Student Institute spon- 
sored Victor Borge Night at the Academy of Music to raise 
money for the Building Fund. The Honor Code Committee now 
consists of members of all four classes. For the first time, one 
member of each class has been elected for a term of one 
year to the College Curriculum Committee with full voting 
privileges. The officers of the Student Institute have formed a 
liaison with the Board of Trustees of the Alumni Association 
to keep them better informed on student affairs. S.H.O. has 
been officially recognized as a separate student organization 
at Hahnemann. 



Dr. G. John DiGregorio was Junior Faculty Advisor and Dr. 
Gerald M. Fendrick was Senior Faculty Advisor this year. 



The Hahnemann chapter of the Student American Medical As- 
sociation is considered as a separate sub-committee of the 
Student Institute. Membership in S.A.M.A. has been placed on 
a voluntary basis, although the majority of the Hahnemann stu- 
dent body do obtain memberships during their freshman year. 
Each member receives a monthly issue of The New Physician, 
the journal of the Student American Medical Association. 
S.A.M.A. also offers special insurance programs and fellow- 
ships to its members. 



^AN^ 



SAM A \% 



% § 



^foEO^ 



74 



S.A.M.A. 



UNDERGRADUATE 

RESEARCH 

SOCIETY 




Michael Jay Davidson President 

Louis Rogow Vice President 

Theodore Matulewicz Treasurer 

Roberta Gunnett Secretary 



Twenty-two years ago, an Undergraduate Research Society 
was organized at Hahnemann to encourage students to expand 
their medical education by engaging in extracurricular re- 
search. Opportunities to do research have increased greatly 
during the last decade through the organizational and financial 
support of the faculty and independent research grants. With 
the institution of a new curriculum, students will have an even 
greater opportunity to gain research experience, not only dur- 
ing the summer months, but throughout the entire school year. 
A large number of Hahnemann's recent graduates have partic- 
ipated in one of the many research programs available; and 
during this past summer, over seventy sophomores and juniors 
received research fellowships. 

From a largely honorary society, whose program of activities 
were confined to one day — Undergraduate Research Day — the 
society is now striving to function with a year-round program of 
activities. The program schedule centers around: (1) the crea- 
tion of a summer seminar series involving all students engaged 
in summer research; (2) a quarterly lecture series to be given 
by distinguished members of the scientific community, both in- 
side and outside our institution; (3) a faculty-student research 
committee to review and foster the publication of original stu- 
dent research; and (4) Undergraduate Research Day, at which 
time the ten best papers selected from student research fel- 
lowship reports are presented to the school. 

This year, for the first time, a Research Manual has been com- 
piled and published to provide interested students with de- 
tailed information about projects currently being conducted by 
Hahnemann faculty members interested in sponsoring student 
research. The manual should be of value to students who have 
already begun research projects and desire to communicate 
with investigators in related fields, as well as to those students 
who are considering their initial research experience. 



The Hahnemann Undergraduate Wives Association is a mem- 
ber of the National Women's Auxiliary to the Student Ameri- 
can Medical Association. The two main purposes are social 
and community service. Our projects are aimed at mutually 
tying together the wives of medical students at Hahnemann 
with the community at large. Hahnemann Undergraduate 
Wives Association offers many varied functions, ranging from 
flower and fashion shows to holiday parties for children's wel- 
fare homes. While providing a warm and friendly atmosphere 
for the wives to meet, the Hahnemann Undergraduate Wives 
Association simultaneously derives a great deal of satisfac- 
tion in rendering service to others. 




H.U.W.A. 



75 



A.O.A. 



OFFICERS 
David Albright 
Earl Herr, Pres. 
Tom Rakowski 
John Stasik 
Larry Wallach 




CLASS OF 1969 
Joseph Aita 
Carol Feduska 
Alan Geller 
Robert Goldstein 
Michael Hollander 
Denis King 
Richard Kraus 
Steven Promisloff 
David Raines 
Joel Sokoloff 
Mark Susselman 
Kenneth Wildrick 



CLASS OF 1970 
Glenn Gallow 
Harry Glassman 
Jeffrey Kezis 
H. Jack Pyhel 
Michael Rhodes 



The Alpha Omega Alpha Honorary Medical Society was or- 
ganized at the College of Medicine, University of Illinois, in 
1902. The society comprises three classes of members: -(1) 
Undergraduates to whom membership is granted on the basis 
of scholarship, personal honesty, and potential leadership; (2) 
Alumni and faculty" membership is granted for distinctive 
achievement in the art and practice of scientific medicine, 
and (3) Honorary membership is awarded to eminent leaders 
in medicine and the allied sciences. 

The motto of the society is, "To be worthy to serve the 
suffering." The spirit of the society is set forth in its motto 
and in a modern interpretation of the Hippocratic Oath. It is 
the duty of members to promote its ideals, to foster the scien- 
tific and philosophical features of the medical profession, to 
look beyond self to the welfare of the profession and of the 
public, to cultivate social-mindedness as well as an individ- 
ualistic attitude toward responsibilities, to show respect for 
colleagues and teachers, to foster research, and in all ways 
to ennoble the profession of medicine and advance it in pub- 
lic opinion. 

The most prominent requisite of membership is high scholar- 
ship in a broad sense. Scholarship is more than a record of 
high average grades and facility in memorizing information. It 
connotes continuous industry, facility in correlating facts and 
an intellectual grasp that permits application of information to 
new problems. Equal to these qualities is moral character in 
its broadest sense, including responsibility and honesty in all 
affairs, as well as other qualitative factors such as individual- 
ity and open-mindedness. 



The Serpent Society is the service fraternity to the College, 
and is made up of Seniors, Juniors, and Sophomores. The 
Society's activities include: providing students to act as 
guides for tours of Hahnemann, receiving dignitaries visiting 
our College, and acting as escorts accompanying Hahnemann 
Staff members visiting undergraduate college campuses. 




SERPENT SOCIETY 



76 



PHI 



DELTA 



EPSILON 




Phi Delta Epsilon is a national medical fraternity with over 60 
chapters in the United States and Europe. The Beta Zeta 
Chapter serves many functions at Hahnemann, both as a so- 
cial group and as a professional organization. The Fraternity 
sponsors a biweekly lecture and film series, parties, athletic 
events, an annual Aaron Brown Lecture and Dinner, and many 
other activities. The Fraternity is socially and professionally 
active in conjunction with other Phi Delta Epsilon Chapters 
and Graduate Clubs in Philadelphia and in other cities. It also 
offers a loan program and scholarships to needy students. 



PHI 



Phi Lambda Kappa Medical Fraternity is a national and inter- 
national organization composed of medical students and 
graduate physicians across the United States, Jamaica, Eu- 
rope and Asia. The Medical Students Aid Society is the 
philanthropic arm of Phi Lambda Kappa offering interest-free 
loans to medical students, augmenting the growth of medical 
facilities at several institutions and fostering many other 
charitable activities. At Hahnemann, the Alpha Beta Chapter 
partakes of an active and varied social and academic pro- 
gram throughout the year. The wives' club, a part of the Na- 
tional Women's Auxiliary to the Phi Lambda Kappa Fraternity, 
is also prolific in staging charitable and social functions. The 
more than one hundred undergraduate members of our Fra- 
ternity enjoy a close and rewarding relationship with the Phila- 
delphia Alumni Club and strong ties to the national organiza- 
tion. 



LAMBDA 



KAPPA 




77 



•» >. 




I 





I 



. 




*-^. 





CANDIDS 












GREAT MOMENTS 



' 




K || 


^* 9 






*L A 






A 1 




*\tir 




^^^^^J B^fl 







"How you like Hawaiian punch?' 



"I don't care what Dr. Fink would say." 








'Bore a hole, bore a hole 



The Creature from the Black Lagoon 






"Not now, Tc 



"Get off my back.' 



'Gird your loins, girls." 



mi*<& 





■ 
■ 



"Hmmm, a red-breasted bed thrasher. 







'Medical Cultism is not dead at Hahnemann. 



'Gesundheit!" Hahnemann Macrophage at work 



1 


JB *"Hi'*^ 






1 fewb 

\ 




% 







The oAnnual Outing of the 'Berth Control 

Jfcjeague 



81 






y 






as 



R 





/ 



^ 



k 










+ 











82 









NIGHTINGALES 





5»* '// \ 




i 



l^ 4 > 






^ 








83 





"If it doesn't work out, we can always fill in the values. 




"He needs it STAT!' 





'Hey, that new bilingual film about lesbianism just started.' 




TECHNICALLY YOURS 



"Eenie, meenie, minie, moe . . ." 




"42 ... 29 ... 64 .. . hike!' 
LAB VAMP AT WORK 




TILT 





"What nerve! He asked me to do a rhythm 
strip just for him." 



1 


•" *cU 




• ■ 4 


- t i mnj \« 



INTERNS & RESIDENTS 




QUEEN 




"When -I grow up. I'm going 
to be an OB-GYN man.'' 



SIGNS OF THE TIMES 




ACCIDENT WARD FEE 

b'5.00 
ALL MEDICINES EXTRA 
PAYABLE AT THE TIME OF TREATMENT 
ALL PATIENTS MUST PRESENT 
IDENTIFICATIONS INCLUDING D.P.A. 




ROOM 



Id] 

[Qi 



HEALTH CLINIC 
> 



UN*** A 






<#£/?/? 4^ci? 

iVid 



n 

9§ 



RAY 

^QUESTS 





SHUNT CARE 

CLEAN DAILY 
25WAB WITH BETAD1NE 
3. CLEAN SKIN WELL 
A WIPE WITH ALCOHOL 
5.APPLY CLEAN 4X4'5 
6APPLY FRESH KLING 
79ECLH: WITH TAPE 

% 

Wck. oe 

^60< RAKK 6<PtK Fortes 



^5^rv^oR^»>iT\ 



iKvxweDi A*rec^ 





•PARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY 



CLINICAL LABORATORY 



SEROLOGY 
DIRECTOR 



<m 



INFORMATION 
URINALYSIS 





HEMATOLOGY 15 



CHBvUS 1 



rc? 



IT 



We CO* ]fl! CLEA*//^ ^///T^ 



or 

F0# / 






I 






, 




0. R. PERSONNEL 

ONLY 
N PROPER ATTIRE 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



SURGERY 



.BARONOFSKYJULntDJ 








TION 

CLOSED! 






SERaSON 

PUTCh 



DUTCHMEN 




MALE LAVATORY 

MEDICAL STUDENTS ONLY 







ROBERT BOWER- M.O. 






■:" , .'i-H.''. , -''ffT!i 



J , ».. l i-i-f". l -i , i.) 



|l",.».^l. - JI , .'.»^-g3 

" ' T il 



THE HAHNEMANN ALUMNI of 

PHILADELPHIA 

THROUGH THEIR GENEROSITY 

HAVE MADE POSSIBLE 

THIS OPERATING ROOM SUITE 



DR. J. P MERRILL 
ANNUAL AOA LECTURE 



4 PM 
ALUMNI HALL 



2-12-69 



Juice °32s,isr 20 
en. ZfOGs TbKi.ir. 

J\J Coffer Rarnn /!) 



Coffee, focon 
, 2-EGGSltMst 

Coffee . e>acon 
!> W Si HOMEFRiEi; 



60 



90 



r Cured 



Jfam '■• 



TOST ^ COTff 



HOTCTM DECEMBER 17, 196B, 
VISITING IS RESTRICTED TO ADULT 

MEMBEPS OF THE PATIENT'S 

IMMEDIATE FAMILY. 

VISITOR PASSES ARE AVAILABLE 
AT THE FRONT INFORMATION DESK 

ANO MUST BE RETURNED 

AS THE VISITOR LEAVES. 

YOUR ASSISTANCE IS REQUESTEO IN 
HELPING US PROTECT OUR PATIENTS, 
STAFF ANO VISITORS FROM EXPOSURE 
TO THE HONG KONG FLU. 



THANK VOU. 

HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 

ANO HOSPITAL 



jSrjS*W 



PODIATRY 

ANNOUNCING THREE $7,000 

SCHOLARSHIPS TO BE 

AWARDED BY THE 

AMERICAN PODIATRY ASSOCIATION 

For the 1969-70 academic year 







-/-..H/--II rst onn/Atsr 







FAMILIAR SCENES 



.fsffAHNEMANN 
JCHEONETTE 

KPAST lU»CH S1ACKS 

m 



.UNCHEONETTE^ 





• 0N: ) W , 
1 FAY £ ^-^ JuM Jine food 







ESTRICTED AREA 

NSTRUCTION PERSONNEL 
|ND EQUIPMENT ONLY 






UNDERCLASSMEN 




Department of 



The Hahnemann Medical College 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

September 9, 1968 to May 31, 1969 

Subject 



Final grades obtained by a computation of marks earned at recitations, test examinations, and final 
examinations. RE-EXAMINATION— FINAL GRADE. (Cross out words not applying.) 

Enter all failures in RED 



Roll 
Number 


6 




Roll 
Number 


■tl 

a 

<5 


i. 


ALTSCHULER, Mark K. 




61. 


MANDARINO. Michael J. 




2. 


AMROM, George J. 




62. 


MASCARO. Ester M. 




3. 


ANDREWS, George R. 




63. 


MAYERSON. Hollis L. 




4. 


ASNIS, Gregory M. 




64. 


McGIRR. Michael J. 




5. 


BAER. Phyllis B. 




65. 


McLAUGHLIN. Edward 




6. 


BAER, Stephen D. 




66. 


MELBOURNE, John D. 




7. 


BAKER, Thomas E. 




67. 


MENDOLA. John V. 




8. 


BARCLAY, Claylon C, Jr. 




68. 


MILEY, Gerald B. 




9. 


BERKOWITZ, Roy E. 




69. 


MILGRIM. Franklin C. 




10. 


BISHOP, Richard L. 




70. 


MIURA. Karen K. 




11. 


BITAR, Roger A. 




71. 


MORGAN. James W.. Jr. 




12. 


BOLINGER, Poni S. 




72. 


MYERS. Frederick B. 




13. 


BOLOGNESE, Michael A. 




73. 


NARDELL, Edward A. 




14. 


BOUCHER, William F.. Jr. 




74. 


NARY, Thomas I. 




15. 


BRONSTEIN. Robert M. 




75. 


NAYTHONS. Matthew E. 




16. 


CARPENTER. Robert J., in 




76. 


NOVACK, Dennis H. 




17. 


CARVER. Joseph R. 




77. 


PENDRAK. Robert F. 




18. 


CHEN. Eleanor M. 




78. 


PUSNIK. Alan J. 




19. 


CHERRY, Herbert O. 




79. 


RADOFF, Alan M. 




20. 


CITRON. Carl S. 




80. 


REINER. Leslie M. 




21. 


CLINTON. Lawrence P. 




81. 


RESTIVO. Carl 




22. 


COHEN. Leonard H. 




82. 


REUTTER, Richard A. 




23. 


COLADONATO, Joseph P. 




83. 


RINALDI. Robert E. 




24. 


COLEMAN. Richard G. 




84. 


ROBINSON. K. Emory, Jr. 




25. 


CONROE, Henry G. 




85. 


ROBINSON, Michael C. 




26. 


COOK. Willard H. 




86. 


ROSENBERG. John R. 




27. 


CORVASCE. Joseph M. 




87. 


RUBIN. Stanley A. 




28. 


COTTLER. Edward H. 




88. 


RUDNICK, Michael R. 




29. 


CUSACK. Anne M. 




89. 


RUSKIN. Sharon 




30. 


DEMCHICK. Bruce 




90. 


SANDS. Joel B. 




31. 


DODEK. Marvin I. 




91. 


SAUL. Barry J. 




32. 


DOMSKY, Alan I. 




92. 


SCHAMBERG. Jay F. 




33. 


EMKEY, Kenneth D. 




93. 


SCHRAER, David J. 




34. 


ENDERS. John G. 




94. 


SCHWARTZ. Neil 




35. 


ETTINGER. Virginia E. 




95. 


SCIPIONE. Charles R. 




36. 


FAGEN. Neil D. 




96. 


SENEKJIAN. Harry O. 




37. 


FISCHER. Carl R., Ill 




97. 


SETO. Robert S. 




38. 


FLOCH. Howard F. 




98. 


SHIPPEN. Eugene R.. Ill 




39. 


GABROY. James B. 




99. 


SIVITZ. WUliam I. 




40. 


GAISIN. Allen 




100. 


SLOVAK, James P. 




41. 


GASTALDO, John A. 




101. 


SMURO. Daniel J. , 




42. 


GINDHART, Thomas D. 




102. 


SOMMER. John T. 




43. 


GOULDIN. Judith A. 




103. 


SPIEGEL. Robert K. 




44. 


GREEN. Barry P. 




104. 


STEINFELD. Martin A. 




45. 


HESSELMAN, Helen R. 




105. 


TAPPER. F. Bruce 




46. 


HIRSCH, Harry J. 




106. 


TEEARS. Robert J. 




47. 


HIRSHBERG. Gary E. 




107. 


THOMAS, Christopher W. 




48. 


HUMENIK, Joseph F. 




108. 


TINKELMAN, David G. 




49. 


ISRAEL. Warren 




109. 


VEITH. Gary E. 




50. 


JOYNES. Robert J. 




110. 


WAGNER. Robert E. 




51. 


KANDL Louis C. 




111. 


WEIRMAN. Frank J. 




52. 


KATZ, Theodore T. 




112. 


WEISBURG. Rhoda S. 




53. 


KELSEN, David P. 




113. 


ZENONE. Eugene A. 




54. 


KERPEN. Howard O. 




114. 


ZONAY. Francis J. 




55. 


KISTLER. David W. 




115. 


ZURHELLEN. William M. 




56. 


KLEIN. Neil E. 




116. 






57. 


LALLY. Robert F., Jr. 




117. 




58. 


LEVITSKY. Carl M. 




i !8. 




59. 


LOSBEN. Stephen J. 




119. 




60. 


LUTZ. Ronald A. 




120. 






Final reports should be submitted on this official report to the office of the 
Registrar. A duplicate report of the above grades must be retained by the 
head of a department. 

(Signature) 
Date submitted Head of Department of 






















'You may fill in: male, female, or my mother never told me. 




It takes a brain and a half to get through Hahnemann. 




FRESHMEN 



"You're a great class," Dr. Hugh D. Bennett, As- 
sociate Dean, told Hahnemann's Class of 1972 as 
the three-day orientation session ended. Tacitly, 
116 heads nodded. 

After all, a record number of us had not been 
graduated from college. Further testifying to our 
collective good sense, only 20 per cent had tied 
the knot that binds. While 67 per cent of us came 
from the Pennsylvania environs, we were not 
totally parochial: Karen Miura hails from Colo- 
rado, Roger Bitar from Oregon, and Gene Ship- 
pen from Florida. 

We were new; we were fresh. But if, on that early 
September morn, psychotonic visions of ne- 
crosadism danced in our heads; our naivete by 
cool October had, alas, given way to a mor- 
phinistic attentiveness during gross anatomy lec- 
tures. 

Some odd facts on '72: Ester Mascaro is one of 
fifteen children (N.B. one mother); Steve, age 25, 
and Phyllis, age 29, Baer are the only husband 
and wife medical student team; we have two veg- 
etarians, one graphologist, a Ph.D. candidate 
from Nigeria, and twelve women students. 




"One textbook costs $20.00 ... he must be kidding. 



• -^ i ^ > kJ fc-' far 




"Before reading this manual, take two 
aspirin; for repeat headache, darvon is rec- 
ommended." 





'I said, 'Just a little of the top. 



"Just because we share the same box doesn't mean you can use my tie to dust the 
slides." 





- -'•*••' ' -J'S 




Department of 



The Hahnemann Medical College 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 
September 9, 1968 to May 31, 1969 

Subject 



Final grades obtained by a computation of marks earned at recitations, test examinations, and final 
examinations. RE-EXAMINATION— FINAL GRADE. (Cross out words not applying.) 





Enter all failures 


in RED 








Roll 
Number 


•T3 
6 




Roll 
Number 


■o 


i. 


ABBEY. Leland 




61. 


KOPYCINSKT. r.larfc F. 




2. 


ARENSON. Edward 




62. 


KHAMFR. Gary H. 




3. 


BABIC. Stephen 




63. 


KRAYBILL. M a r aret A. 




4. 


BARRON. Stephen 




64. 


KRON. Lawrence F. 




5. 


BATES, Ollice, Jr. 




65. 


KUHNS. John R. 




6. 


BECKER. Joseph 




66. 


KUPERS. Norman M. 




7. 


BEDNAREK. Joseph 




67. 


LAFFEY, Stephen H. 




8. 


BERGER. Mark 




68. 


LAMON. Edward J. 




9. 


BIDWELL. Georgetta C. 




69. 


LANG. Forrest 




10. 


BLACK. Robert 




70. 


LESSIG, Harry J. 




11. 


BLEEDEN, Edward M. 




71. 


LEVY. Bruce A. 




12. 


BLESHMAN. Michael H. 




72. 


LICHTENFELD. J. Leonard 




13. 


BREMER, Harry L. 




73. 


LISTON. Thomas E. 




14. 


BURKETT, Eric 




74. 


MacFADYEN. James J. 




15. 


CAMODY. Patricia A. 




75. 


MACHINTON. Stephen 




16. 


CAMPO. Anthony 




76. 


MATARAZZO. Stephen A. 




17. 


CANTON. Henry H.. Jr. 




77. 


MATZKO. Michael J. 




18. 


CARLSON. Richard 




78. 


McCOLE. James R. 




19. 


CASS. Paul T. 




79. 


McMAHON. Edward P. 




20. 


CHECK. Jerome H. 




80. 


MELNICK. Melvin P. 




21. 


CHILDS. T. Craiq 




81. 


MEYER, Charles T. 




22. 


CICCIARELLI. Alan J. 




82. 


MEYER. Richard S. 




23. 


CONNELL. Janet T. 




83. 


MILES. Michael 




24. 


CONVERY. Patricia A. 




84. 


MILLER. Gerald M. 




25. 


DAVIS. Duane E. 




85. 


MILLER. Lee H. 




26. 


DeLUCA. Francis N. 




86. 


MINTZ. Mayer R. 




27. 


DERASSE. Alain R. 




87. 


MURRAY. Frederick T. 




28. 


DEVENNEY. John E. 




88. 


NAZZARO. Ralph E. 




29. 


EICHELBERGER. Martin 




89. 


O'NEAL. John R. 




30. 


EISENBERG. Peter D. 




90. 


POIRIER, William 




31. 


ENCK. Robert E. 




91. 


PRAGER. Mark 




32. 


ERVIN, F. Richard 




92. 


RICHTER. Melvyn P. 




33. 


FEIGIN. Ronald 




93. 


ROCK. Michael 




34. 


FIELD. Steven A. 




94. 


ROSSI. Lawrence N. 




35. 


FINK. Theodore 




95. 


RUDDELL, Millard A. 




36. 


FRANK. Howard 




96. 


SCHALDENKO. Vandlm M. 




37. 


FRANKLIN, Irvin D. 




97. 


SCHANTZ. John C. 




38. 


FRIDRICH. Robert E. 




98. 


SCHIFFER. Fredric H. 




39. 


GABROY. Allen S. 




99. 


SHAMES. James 




40. 


GAMBESCIA. Richard A. 




100. 


SICHERMAN. Jay H. 




41. 


GAMZA. Francis C. 




101. 


SNYDER. Ronald D. 




42. 


GIANNITTI, Carol E. 




102. 


SOLTYS. Alan R. 




43. 


GOLDBERG, Constance L. 




103. 


STAFFORD. Calvin R. 




44. 


GOLDMAN. Stanley R. 




104. 


STEN, Jon D. 




45. 


GOODHEART. Herbert P. 




105. 


TONKON. Melvin 




46. 


GOSPER. James A. 




106. 


TRACHTENBERG. William M. 




47. 


GOTTHELF. Michael E. 




107. 


TUMOLA. John J. 




48. 


GRAHAM. Rarry F 




108. 


VERGARE. Michael J. 




49. 


GREENWALD, Lowell T. 




109. 


WASSERMAN. Dean R. 




50. 


GRZYBICKI, Gloria A. 




110. 


WATSON. James R. 




51. 


HALE. Robert H. 




111. 


WEIDIG, Jeffrey C. 




52. 


HEINRICH. Ward D„ Jr. 




112. 


WEINBERG. Stephen E. 




53. 


HERSHKOWITZ. Robert P. 




113. 


WEISMER. Richard M. 




54. 


HERTZ. Lee H. 




114. 


WOHL. Armand 




55. 


HOLDEN. W. Stanley 




115. 


ZAHNISER. John 




56. 


HOLLOWAY. John R. 




116. 




57. 


KALTENBAUGH. Orle E. 




117. 




58. 


KARASICK. Sheldon R. 




I!8. 




59. 


KIRKPATRICK. George L. 




119. 




60. 


KNOX. William J. 




'20. 






Final reports should be submitted on this official report to the office of 
Registrar. A duplicate report of the above grades must be retained by 
head of a department. 

(Signature) 
Date submitted Head of Department of 


the 
the 





















SOPHOMORES 



^ 











What a difference a year makes! Any resemblance or 
facsimile to persons seen in Classroom B is purely 
factitious. Only the names have been kept to protect 
the faculty. Bearded and mustached, with fresh vigor 
and uncompromising zeal, we entered the world of 
bugs and drugs. Immediately polarized after the first 
micro quiz, the class was divided into two schools of 
thought: "tell it like it is" vs. "don't Rock the boat." 

We had our interesting moments: class meetings and 
our Talmudic Scholar, Community Medicine and the 
Thesaurus, Dr. Moat and his "bar flies." At least we 
could still laugh at the inappropriate. And we made it 
through; some to their surprise, others to their satis- 
faction, but most in spite of themselves. 

On to Pathology, that 
dreaded ogre voraciously 
awaiting to "rape and de- 
vour" the unsuspecting and 
the weak. We prepared for 
the conflict with thick skin 
and pointed barbs, ready to 
battle against the final obsta- 
cle; but we were neglectful of 
the elements. How could a 
mere medical student antici- 
pate an indoor dust storm or 
a frigid gust, which came 
when neither he nor his pro- 
fessors expected? 

This year of trials and tribula- 
tions is history now, for to- 
morrow will take us to the 
X& Golden Promised Land of the 

^^W Clinical Years. Are we fan- 

4, tisizing? Where we expected 

I lions, did we find lambs? 



"Mirror, mirror, on the wall 





■ 








99 




"I don't think it's nice to watch 
while they're conjugating." 



100 




101 



Department of 



The Hahnemann Medical College 

JUNIOR CLASS 
September 9, 1968 to May 31, 1969 

Subject 



Final grades obtained by a computation of marks earned at recitations, test examinations, and final 
examinations. RE-EXAMINATION— FINAL GRADE. (Cross out words not applying.) 





Enter all failures 


in RED 








Roll 

Number 


■ 




Roll 
Number 


•8 

m 


i. 


ARTHUR. rr»ry r 




61. 


MOSCATO. Antrmny F. 




2. 


BAKER. OMirtnAy F, 




62. 


MUMMFRT. KnnnAtr. T.. 




3. 


BARTT.T.A IVn,M E, 




63. 


MURPHY. Rirharrl T. 




4. 


BARRON. T.lnyrf F TT 




64. 


MUTCHNir.TT. Norman 




5. 


BAXTER. John A. 




65. 


McCLELLAN. Robert M. 




6. 


BECK. Allan (l 




66. 


McENERNEY. Mary A. 




7. 


BEIN. Nnm.r N 




67. 


McMILLEN. James I. 




8. 


BERGMAN. Herbert M. 




68. 


NEWMARK. Thomas S. 




9. 


BEVILACOTJA. n»r,i«l F, 




69. 


OLNEY. Charles J. 




10. 


BICKEI-. GwynnA T 




70. 


PARENTE. Thomas J.. Jr. 




11. 


BONIKOWSKT Fr.nl, p, 




71. 


PETROSKI. Donald 




12. 


BONOS. Charlen T. TTT 




72. 


PYHEL, Helmut J. 




13. 


BRACKIN. Georgn fi. 




73. 


RADOFF, Geoffrey P. 




14. 


BRACKIN. Phillip S. 




74. 


RATNER. Jerald H. 




15. 


BRADLEY. Vincent D. 




75. 


REISER, Howard B. 




16. 


BROWNSTEIN. Kermath P. 




76. 


RHODES, Michael 




17. 


BRUBAKER. Jay K. 




77. 


RICHTER. Stanley E. 




18. 


BRUTTOMESSO. Samuel D. 




78. 


RIGBERG, Stephen V. 




19. 


CANCRO. J. Chrlaa 




79. 


RONDINA, James B. 




20. 


CAPRIOTTI. Richard D. 




80. 


ROSEN, Eric P. 




21. 


CAREY. John P.. Jr. 




81. 


ROSENBERG, Stanley A. 




22. 


CEHELYK. Bohdan 




82. 


RUDNITZKY, Elliot M. 




23. 


CITRIN. Kerry A. 




83. 


SANFORD, Robert G. 




24. 


COLE, Daniel 




84. 


SAYLOR, Lyle T. 




25. 


CONSIGLIERE. Glno A. 




85. 


SCHOTT, C. Richard 




26. 


COOPEY, Frederick D. 




86. 


SHAW, Robert, Jr. 




27. 


DAVIS, Joan L. 




87. 


SIVAK, Edward D. 




28. 


DETWILER. Charles K.. Jr. 




88. 


SKVERSKY. Robert 




29. 


DINENBERG, Lawrence 




89. 


SMITH. Roqer M. 




30. 


EVANS, Michael A. 




90. 


SNYDER, Elliot L. 




31. 


FULCHIERO, Greaorv J. 




91. 


SOSLOW, Arnold R. 




32. 


GALLOW, Glenn H. 




92. 


STRAUB, Lawrence P. 




33. 


GLASSMAN, Harry 




93. 


SUSSMAN. Mark N. 




34. 


GRAF, Kenneth W. 




94. 


SWANK, Michael 




35. 


HAHN, Jonathan F. 




95. 


SYMANOWICZ, Donald B. 




36. 


HAIN, Su C. 




96. 


TWARDZIK, Frank G. 




37. 


HARRISON. Walter L. 




97. 


UROSKIE, Theodore W. 




38. 


IACOVONI, Victor E. 




98. 


VanCAMPEN, Jack D. 




39. 


IMBRIGLIA, Joseph E. 




99. 


WEINGRAD, Alan 




40. 


JAVIAN. Thomas A. 




100. 


WHEELER, Glen N. 




41. 


JULG. Kathleen J. 




101. 


ZAKUTO, Alan S. 




42. 


KENIG. Lana P. 




102. 


ZELLEY. Lee S. 




43. 


KETOVER, Alan K. 




103. 


ZUCKERMAN, Gilbert L. 




44. 


KEZIS, Jeffrey S. 




104. 




45. 


KIM, Thomas S. 




105. 




46. 


KOMINS, Jeffry I. 




106. 




47. 


KOSOVE, Charles A. 




107. 




48. 


KRIMINS. S. David 




108. 




49. 


LANES. Douglas M. 




109. 




50. 


LEWIS, Alexander, III 




110. 




51. 


UPSKI, Edward M. 




Ml. 




52. 


LISI. Louise M. 




112. 






53. 


LOTZ, Preston R. 




113. 




54. 


LUCEY, John D. 




114. 




55. 


MATULEWICZ, Theodore J. 




115. 




56. 


MATUS, Michael A. 




116. 




57. 


MELTZER, Mae B. 




117. 




58. 


MELTZER, Robert G. 




i 18. 




59. 


MITTELDORF. Stephen E. 




119. 




60. 


MOBLEY, Sylvester L. 




120. 






Final reports should be submitted on this official report to the office of 
Registrar. A duplicate report of the above grades must be retained by 
head of a department. 

(Signature) 
Date submitted Head of Department of 


the 

the 





















JUNIORS 




In September, following a two year history of 
cephalgia, colitis, diaphoresis, and neurogenic 
bladder, we became clinicians. Resplendent in 
white, although ignorant of the art, we were sud- 
denly turned loose on the unsuspecting patients. 
Our initial fears were real for we had only worked 
with animals for the past two years and our cure 
rate was not spectacular. But our feelings of pur- 
pose and relief at having escaped the preclinical 
years intact and functioning spurred us ever on- 
ward. We were given first call in the hospital and 
became the selfless, vigilant healers, ready to 
minister to the needs of our patients. The novel 
rewards of the obligation faded as time pro- 
gressed and as fatigue, boredom, and increasing 
gluteal pain came along. Our enchantment waned 
even further during the long nights in the hospital 
and the endless days in clinic. 

However, we had yet to reckon with the Multiple 
Track System, a variation on the theme "Cast 
your fate to the computor," which is currently in 
vogue at Hahnemann. We filled in the data cards 
with our vital statistics and were punched out and 
fed into the infamous Hahnemann Computor. The 
Brain, in turn, swallowed the information, buzzed 
its circuits for a while, and regurgitated our sen- 
ior schedules along with the names and phone 
numbers of five other students who would be our 
Ideal Mates. So we chose our major tracks, clini- 
cal laboratories, general electives, and finally 
selected our free electives. Most of us translated 
the idea freely and arranged our electives as far 
away from Hahnemann as possible. 




"Now they tell me you have to wear a glove. 



'About my own research in the field . . ." 




". . . and if tuition were cut fifty per cent, we would need 
only half the student loan fund." 



103 






'Another 5:00 P.M. admission, huh?" 



"I said breathe, not burp. 



104 





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SHa*-*^-. 



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Bn^H 
£3wK§2 



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o 



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'What are you doing later tonight, Steve?' 



•Pseudospondylolisthesis . . . another crock. 




105 





"It'll never work. 



"You seem all wound up about lUD's. 




106 




"You mean you're taking pictures today?' 




"Scotty doggies . . . next he'll be talking 
about lead pipes." 



tt—wyj^wamijal 




"My big brother told me not to sweat it." 






"Who else got married?' 





"26 Y/O WF, NAD WD WN. 36 24 36 



I H 
■ 



I . I " 




CLASS OF 1 969 



William B. Aarons, Jr., M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Lafayette College, B.A. 






K 



jLlLx^^t*-^v v 



tHtia-mca<aa M.V\ 



Keevan Abramson, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 






in 



^e^Jifijg, 



/<*3^tJl, 



Saverio J. Aita, M.D. 

Levittown, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University, B.S. 




112 



David J. Albright, M.D. 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Muhlenberg College, B.S. 






113 



Thomas J. Antos, M.D. 

Sharpsville, Pennsylvania 
St. Vincent College, B.A. 





Bruce J. Basch, M.D. 

West Hartford, Connecticut 
Trinity College, B.S. 






115 




Jeffrey M. Bell, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Rochester, B.A. 






<1 







xjjJa*^ A^^^^.A-c^ 



Justin A. Bergman, M.D. 

Little Neck, New York 
Queens College, B.A. 








yoyo- /U<s^ jjrtjhu, lk<j) 
Joyce Ann Bockar, M.D. 

Kew Gardens, New York 
Queens College, A.B. 





U 



118 



Thomas W. Bonekemper, M.D. 

Lansdale, Pennsylvania 
Kutztown State College, B.S. 







% 



jxpj 



/?« — e/"^/? 



Philip L. Bonnet, M.D. 

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 
Lehigh University, B.A. 





120 



Victor Borden, M.D. 

Paterson, New Jersey 
Temple University, B.A. 






121 



%dLtS*JLin-P. 

Joel R. Bouch, M.D. 

Ventnor, New Jersey 
Rutgers University, B.A. 





+ 





Frank W. Bowen, Jr., M.D. 

Media, Pennsylvania 
Bucknell University, B.S. 







123 



Joseph Francis Bubinak, M.D. 

Willow Grove, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University, B.S. 






124 




CoA Gf&JLX".*' 



Timothy Trevor Cope, M.D. 

Red Lion, Pennsylvania 
Ursinus College, B.S. 






126 




?^ DcW/ Qm 



Peter DeGraff Cross, M.D. 

Neenah, Wisconsin 
University of Pennsylvania, B.A. 






Maria Theresa Daniele, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 




Robert K. Danish, M.D. 

Newark, New Jersey 
University of Pennsylvania, A.B. 






Michael Jay Davidson, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania, B.A. 






130 



Qikjuui 



lit, -^UrC^ 



Barry M. Farber, M.D. 

Brooklyn, New York 
Brooklyn College, A.B. 






Carol A. Feduska, M.D. 

Rochester, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University, B.S. 







132 



Elliot D. Felman, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania, B.A. 






William Richard Fike, M.D. 

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 
Elizabethtown College, B.S. 





134 




Richard M. Flacco, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University, B.S. 





* 



136 




Gerald J. Frankel, M.D. 

North Bergen, New Jersey 
Franklin and Marshall College, B.A. 





II 






w 



&*\ 



Alan S. Geller, M.D. 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 
Brown University, B.S. 





138 




John H. Genrich, M.D. 

Buffalo, New York 
Johns Hopkins University, B.A. 







JA 



. tf/Z 



David S. Gillon, Jr., M.D. 

Pennsville, New Jersey 
Rutgers University, B.A. 










\\ 




V4y 




f 












140 



%*9m : 



Robert Goldstein, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, A.B. 





141 




S. Roberta Gunnett, M.D. 

Williamsburg, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.S. 






r 



V M 



142 



Martin F. Hayes, Jr., M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph's College, B.S. 






fyL 1 1&yJ£^ ) t». p. 

John F. Hazelton, Jr., M.D. 

Rumford, Rhode Island 
University of Pennsylvania, B.A. 








^^S 




> w**"S ^^ / 


i ( I^^Bj^^^^^ 


* ^1 i^^ 1^1 






144 



Mark L Hebel, M.D. 

Linden, New Jersey 
Tufts University, B.S. 




Ronald B. Heisey, M.D. 

Quentin, Pennsylvania 
Dickinson College, B.S. 






146 



Earl Stanley Herr, M.D. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Howard University, B.S. 





Michael E. Hollander, M.D. 

Brooklyn, New York 
Long Island University, B.S. 






7HJ). 



Howard D. Jones, M.D. 

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 
Lebanon Valley College, B.S. 






Edward R. Kennedy, M.D. 

Shillington, Pennsylvania 
Villanova University, B.S. 






Denis Renz King, M.D. 

Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 
University of Notre Dame, B.S. 






152 





Richard E. Kraus, M.D. 

Chicopee, Massachusetts 
Fairfield University, B.S. 






Leslie S. Kreisler, M.D. 

Brooklyn, New York 
Brooklyn College, B.S. 





Arthur F. Kriner, Jr., M.D. 

Pottsville, Pennsylvania 
Gettysburg College, B.A. 






Arthur T. Laver, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Swarthmore College, B.A. 






156 




r> 



Paul E. Lavoie, M.D. 

Fall River, Massachusetts 
University of Colorado, B.S.E.E. 















..^flfl ^^^k ^B ^^^ 




\m m 


■ 


»< 



157 



William Geoffrey Lefferts, M.D. 

Towanda, Pennsylvania 
Hamilton College, B.A. 





158 




Danny S. Lesnick, M.D. 

Havertown, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph's College, B.S. 





t5Av> %*»\ >W.T> 



Ellis H. Levy, M.D. 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Columbia University, B.A. 






Z3T 



Stephen A. Lorenz, III, M.D. 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Dickinson College, B.S. 






161 




^ ' Jtz~*jTy}AS^ *?J. 



Michael Lee Merrin, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Tufts University, B.S. 






163 




(&tiuajfrn*..,0. 



164 



James F. Mulligan, M.D. 

Newtown Square, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph's College, B.S. 







165 



Drew McCausland, M.D. 

Wayne, Pennsylvania 
Bucknell University, B.S. 




IF- V 




: 




* *J L 




• • 








| 


j. .... 


1 













1^^^ 




^_ 1 





Thomas Patrick McGorry, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
LaSalle College, B.A. 






Stephen L Nemerofsky, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 






168 



m 


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• 






^Js 


S 


V Y 




r 


V 






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t* 


■ 


w 


» j- ■* 


i 


B 






Itj I 




E 












F 



Mary Lynn O'Brien, M.D. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Northwestern University, B.A. 





Michael A. O'Hanlan, M.D. 

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
University of Scranton, B.S. 






170 




Donald Allen Patterson, M.D. 

York, Pennsylvania 
Franklin and Marshall College, B.A. 



7jl C.7&6fc-ut~*®- 



John C. Pentelei-Molnar, M.D. 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 
Fairfield University, B.S. 






Peter Joseph Periconi, M.D. 

New York, New York 

Fordham University, B.S. 

Albert Einstein College of Medicine 






Michael James Piccuta, M.D. 

New Castle, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University, B.A. 






* A 





^ w 



174 




^SK, 



^.W/4 



Steven D. Promisloff, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 






&>j>£.£L.(m 



David Reed Raines, M.D. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
West Virginia University, B.A. 






177 




lt°~.A.{$i!v>$ty, 




Thomas A. Rakowski, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 



mmh 












^'J 


Hr^^ 








m 51 


■ *» 


** i 










Lm 


m. *• *" y ■ 




178 



Richard M. Ress, M.D. 

Yonkers, New York 
New York University, B.A. 





tut!! 



\> V 



179 




Kenneth Robert Rettig, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Princeton University, B.A. 






a 180 



JU^Q. VsM«£ l 



fh.0 



Joseph Anthony Ritsick, M.D. 

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 
Gettysburg College, B.A. 





181 




Stephen J. Rodgers, M.D. 

Warminster, Pennsylvania 
LaSalle College, B.A. 






182 






Louis Michael Rogow, M.D. 

Bayonne, New Jersey 
Trinity College, B.S. 






183 



Richard S. Rose, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 






Arthur Rosenthal, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 






] 



Martin Harold Savitz, M.D. 

Boston, Massachusetts 
Harvard University, A.B. 





Richard L Schneider, M.D. 

Denver, Colorado 
University of Pennsylvania, B.S. 


















F*f < 






^fl B'^HH w 


\ 




' ■ 9 




187 




icUHSwJky HO 

Michael Valerian Sivak, M.D. 

Erie, Pennsylvania 
Gannon College, A.B. 





* 



\i 




Joel Sokoloff, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Cornell University, B.A. 





4£ 



189 




John J. Stasik, M.D. 

Swoyerville, Pennsylvania 
King's College, B.S. 







Barbara J. Stewart, M.D. 

New York, New York 
Trinity College, B.A. 






191 




Mervin Clayton Stover, III, M.D. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Allegheny College, B.A. 












^ j i 








^1 B 


1 






■ 










192 



Mark H. Susselman, M.D. 

Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania, B.A. 






193 



Steven W. Tendler, M.D. 

Havertown, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 






194 




A. Robert Tessler, M.D. 

Merion Station, Pennsylvania 
Franklin and Marshall College, B.A. 





^ 



<3 



jjr&jfb 



John H. Tinker, M.D. 

State College, Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State University, B.S. 





196 




Harvey Tritel, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
University of Pennsylvania, B.A. 







mmH ■ dA 






1 ^m - 1 






■ 


'ii'l 


% 


■ 


■ 









Harris S. Vernick, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
LaSalle College, B.A. 




-•» 





199 





^L^ UiMU.il. P. 

Lawrence Wallach, M.D. 

Bayside, New York 
Queens College, B.S. 



^ouneroceW.u)eilt9M.O. 

Lawrence M. Wells, M.D. 

Forest Hills, New York 
Queens College, B.S. 






201 



Rodney A. Wenrich, M.D. 

Auburn, Pennsylvania 
Muhlenberg College, B.S. 






V^ttc^^ 



si 



Michael A. Weiner, M.D. 

Newark, New Jersey 
Rutgers University, B.A. 






203 



Kenneth Harold Wildrick, M.D. 

Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania 
Bucknell University, B.S. 





204 




David Owen Williams, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Trinity College, B.S. 






Anthony R. Zappacosta, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 







206 



ri. 



Edward N. Zissman, M.D. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Temple University, B.A. 






207 



William J. Zweibel, M.D. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
LaSalle College, B.A. 





208 



grri 



>\h 



An old, reliable and ever-helpful home treat- 
ment for Piles, no matter how 
Bevere the case. It la as 
OlIfTT^^ gentle an water, <lh soothing 
2f If fl las balm, and quickly ban- 
ishes the pain and torture 
I of this distressing ailment. 
' BETTON'S Pile Salve 
will cure Piles, wb-ther 
- • v -vr^^- blind, bleeding. Itching or 
hl**_4*^^ other type. A record of 50 years' 
^-s* 9 ^ BUCcess. At iJrugglsts or send 50c, 
with name and address; free by mall. 

W1NKELMANN & BROWN DRUG CO., Baltimore, Md. 



%i%} 



Are You 

■rife ring with Consumption in any stage t With A sth- 
, Bronchitis, Catarrh, or any affection of the Lungs, 
■oat, and Air-Pasiagest Are you afflicted with any 
angement of the Nervous System, or with any Disor- 
of the Stomach, Liver, or Bowels f- If bo, send for a 
e rBESOBipriON (inclosing stamp), to REV. CHARLES 
UNG, Station D, Bible House, N. Y. P. S. The Sum- 
• months are most favorable for treatment. 



-&ZZZ 



| te* STOP DRINKING 



GnnJUIUQUORCURE 



SIUMNTEED TO KSTMV AU 

0UIMK FDR UqUOR 
okiy ay 



I 5CA)?5 RQCBUCK & Cfl.WC. CHICAGO ILL 




rHE WONDERFUL ELECTRIC CIRCLET 

|niek Cur« or KheumitUn. This marvellous lnven- 
ion has cured over three thousand persons of Rheu- 
aatlsm. WK HAVE Tfc.vriMONULS ATTESTING ITS 
VONDEItFDL QUICK CUKE. No medicine, simply to 
rear the Circlet around the ankle next the stein. 
'rke, $2. on. Will be mailed free upon receipt of the 
>ric*. Agents wanted everywhere. 
THE WONDERFUL ELECTRIC CIRCLET CO. 

Room 18, 116 Worth Street, New York till. 



ARTIFICIAL LEGS 



3 ARMS. Selpho's Patent. 516 Broadway, N. Y., 
osite St. Nicholas Hotel. Send for a Circular. 

eeman's Pepsin Gum. 

CAUTION.— See that the t™a 
Beemaa la on each wrapper. 

The Perfection of Che win a 
earn and a Dellelona Remedy 
for Indication. Each tablet con- 
tains one grain Beeman's pure pepsin. 
Send S eenta for sample package. 
HE BEEMAN CHEMICAL CO. 

No. 9 Lake St., Cleveland, 0. 
Originators of Pepsin Chewing Qum. 





CiWl TO MAKE OTHERS LOVE 

LP \l\L and obey you. $1. ICO pg. Book, 10c. 
r to enlarge any part of the body, 10c. National 
, T 2. Chicago. 



Ittest Patent Medicines are Hmnbugri; 
tut DR. TOBIAS warrants his VENETIAN LINI- 
MENT to do alt he recommends it for, or the money 
will bo refunded by his Agents — one will be found in ev- 
ery Village in the State. Jf you have a pain or ache try 
a bottle, it atops pain instantly. Trice 25 and 50 cents 
per bottle. Depot, 66 Cortlandt Street, New York- 
Sold by a" the Druggists. 



HT PEOPLE! 



'reduce your weight SURELY use Wiuar '9 
Obesity Pills and lose 15 pounds a month No 
7 to the health. No Interference with business 
easure. NO STABV1NG. They build up and 
eye the general health, beautify the complexion 
leave NO WRINKLES. Lucy Anderson. 84 
irn St., Cambridge, Maes., write*: Three bottlis 
)ur Obesity Pills reduced my weight from 225 
ds to 190 and I never felt better in alt my life. J 
nuch pleased with the result, and shall do nil J 
to help you. Our patrons include Physicians, 
ters, Lawyers, and leaders of Society. Our 
s are not sold in drug stores; all orders are sup- 
direct from our office. Price per packate $2 00. 
iree packages for $5.00, by mall prepaid. Par 
ars (sealed) 4 cts. ALL CORRESPONDENCE 
IFIDENTIAL. 

1LLAED REMEDY CO., Boston, Mass. 



Blair's Pills 

Great English Remedy for 



__»_.. . . » . . . 



GOUT and RHEUMATISM. 



SAFE, .SCKt:, /- 

cists, or pi Willi. 




CURE FOR CONSTIPATION. 

The Oriental Fruit Parte, or Aromatic 
Jelly of Figs and Senna, 

la a simple, palatable, and efficacious laxative medicine, 
good at all times. 
Sold by Druggists every where. 
J. W. NOKCROS3 & CO., Wholesale Agents, 

91 Fulton Street, New York. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*» 

FREE REMEDY 

To Enlarge Small Male Oriani a 



When Caused l.y 



SELF 



ABUSE: 



Or Eicnibi. A lure cure for Lo«t Vltcor. im- j 

potency. Nervoui Debility. ICiqiiiiioiii and % 

Vincocele. Never return". I liftTe tbe recipe A 

winch cured me of tueie dleeaiet. aod wbicb I 4 

will een<I liealed] Pre- to «dt oue id Deed of 4 

It. L. liBADLET. Box M 21, Kittle Creek, Mlcb. 2 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



BR0M0-SELTZER 




CURES 

HEADACHE. 

Nervousness, Sleeplessness, 

Nausea, Brain Fatigue, 

AND ALL FORMS OF 

DISORDERED STOMACH. 

Contains no opiates of any kind nor Anti-Pyrine 
A palatable, potent, prompt, safe 

" SHAPE UP." 

Price, 10c, 25c, 50c. and $1 per bottle. 

At Druggists, or milled prepaid upon 
receipt of price. 

EMERSON DRUG CO.. BALTIMORE. M0. 



BARRY S TRICOPHEROUS 

FOR THE 

HAIRanpsKIN. 




An elegant dressing, Prevents 

baldness, gray hair, and dandruff. 

Makes the hair grow thick and soft. 

', Cures eruptions and diseases of the 

skin. Heals cuts, burns, brutsesand 

sprains. All druggists orby mall 50 cts. 44 StoneSt.N.Y. 



lthout doctors 
or medicine, 



OLD EYES MADE NEW 

so mat far-sighted people can do without spectacles; 
by mail, 10 cents. Dr. Foote, Box 788, New York City, 



COOPER'S FLORAL DENTINE, 



SO popular with the Ladies 
for rendering their teeth 
pearly white. With the Gen- 
tlemen for cleansing their 
teeth and perfuming the 
breath. It removes all traces 
of tobacco smoke. Is perfectly 
harmless and delicious to the 
taste. Sent by mall for 25c. 
At all dealers. Send 3c. stamp 
for sample to 

A. COOPEB & HAErElTBUMH 
Chemists, Xisgsto& l '.'. 7. 




THAT which maiM KINGLY MEHwhomwIm^a 
sweetheu-U adore. FB£E> JKB&kt Lnst.. Jersey City, N J. 





MHICDICATF.D 

COMPlfXION 
POWDER 

makes them 
beautiful. 
TRY IT. 

7SA« no Substitute. 

\\ fanSAU!teirrwHttitof 




Friendly Regard 




little ones of 



is never en- 
tertained by 
the children 
for a medi- 
ci ne that 
tastes bad. 
This explains 
the popular- 
ity among 



Scott's Emulsion, 

a preparation of cod-liver 
oil almost as palatable as 
milk. Many mothers have 
grateful knowledge of its 
benefits to weak, sickly 
children. 



FLESH MADE 

WITH 



Tablet* l« ■ KdentUo proeeea I 
nimllmliin of every form <>t food, aeoretuut the ralu- 
ible one - ai. I dlaoardlng the worthleea. Tli.y mak< 
thin faoai plump end round out 1 1 ■ «- figure. Thej 

art- the utttiitlaril remedy for leanneee, nrodnot a g II 

tO IS IDS. I'l IT month, > ■..nl.ilnliiif J'«(ir«M'. tad U""r- 
anteed abeola el] loiriiil«-»« Price, prepaid, 
«i per bo*. Pampnli t, 1 1> >\\ TO QBTT kO 

The Tliiiim ura Co., MB llr..n.lwuy, N< » York. 



j »e.»««e%<a»ee,«%»e»r«««««*»**»«««« 

! ! "J^HTHAJC^Uf BAAJPP-*-" 

A bwXof 

BEECHAM'S 

PILLS 

eomtitou-e o 
fimilj idp(]i- 

ciO«cbe»l 
Sick Head- 
aehr, Wmk 

Stomach, 

Loss of Ap- 

pttitr,fTind 

and Pain in 

tKrStomach, 

I I j \\ \^ w * Qiddinr**, 

{ . F\tllne«m,8trrlUnQ aftrr meals, I>izrlnra*, 

< < IhrotMiness, Cold Chiils, PXtuhings of t 

I \Hrat, Shortness of Breath, Oottivenrss, 
ifBiotche* on the Skin, disturbed Sleep, 
t'and all nervous and trembling sensa- 
J \ tion+ are relieved by using theie Pills 

I I Covered with a Tasteless and Soluble Coating 

Of al.drnirjiita Pnc« Sift MDUkboi 

LNew Tork Depot. 3'-6 CausJ 8L 




OPIUM 



HABIT IN ALL 
ITS FORMS. 

r J^=l'f = 1JMJI.J.^'a>aHll=J.|-»l 

MORPHINE. COCAINE. LAUDANUM 

AND KINDRED HABI TS, 
iJ.t-iJU-JJJ.k'JJIIrlJJIIlztrmtii 

CORRCSPONDCNCC COHFIOCNTIAl 
PAMPHLET»«0 PARTICULARS SENT TREE 
ADDRESS: NATIONAL HEALTH CO 

PAXTON BCCCK. OMAHA. NEB. 



P. P. P. 

PARK'S PRICKLY PLASTERS. 

They sooth pain ; they protect the chest; they extract 
— ulated impurities and soreness from the system ; 
trength; they are divided in sections, and 
'ion of the body; they are porous; all 
•vss off, and they can not become of- 
>worn 1. .ir times longer than any 
"aper at 26 cents than others at 
•e, pain can not exist. Weak 
"ate females, or any affected 
should try them. You 
They are a new feature 
Druggists have them, 
rs a Medallion Stamp 



MRS. WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYEUP 

for fifty years has been used by millions of mothers 
for their Children while Teething. It soothes the 
Child, Softens the Gums, Allays alt Pain. Cures Wind 
Colic, and is the best Remedy for Diarrhoea. 25c. a 
bottle. 




DO YOU Vi 
WHI8KKRSORV 
force them to grow lieavi\ 
est face) without stain or 
sent by mail, post free, to av 
der. R. O. GRAHAM, N^ 



DYSPEPSIA AND PITs». 



A sure Cure for these distressing complaints Is inj- 
made known In a "Tbeatisk on Fobeion and Na- 
tive HiBBit. Preparations," published by DR. O. 
PHELPS BROWN. The prescription furnished him has 
cured everybody who has taken It, never having failed in 
a single case. It Is equally sure in esses of Kits as of 
Dyspepsia ; and the ingredients may be found in any 
dro« store. Those who are afflicted with Conr-umption, 
Bronchitis, or Asthma, may also be cured by the use of 
my Herbal Preparations. I will send this valuable pre- 
scription free to any person on receipt of their name. 
Address, DR. O. PHELPS BROWN, No. 19 Grand Street, 
Jersey City, N. J. 



igorates the Gums 

ne breath. Cleanses, Beautifies, 
.n. 
s ists and Fancy Goods Dealers. Price 

HALL & Rl'CKEL, Proprietors, 

21S Greenwich St, New York. 



BROWN'S BABY-TENDER, or Msgic Spring Cradle, 
assumes ten different forms, affords immense relief to 
mothers, and saves the expense of a nurse. If mothers 
generally knew its great value, they would deny them- 
selves one meal a day to procure it — S. Angell, Supt. 
Home for the Friendless, 29th St, N. Y. Send for Illus- 
trated Circular. 

BROWN & CO., 483 Broadway, New York. 



FACIAL BLEMISHES. 

The largest Institution in the 
world for tbe treatment of the 
Skin, Scalp, Nerves and Blood, 
removal of Bolee, Worts, Plm- 
I p:es, Freckles,Tan, Red Veins, 
[Superfluous Hair, Powder and 
I Bin h Mark', and all Skin Imper- 
fections. 20 years practical 
experience. Inventor of Wood- 
bury's Facial Soap for the 
complexion. For sale at all 
Druggist*. Send 10c. forSam- 
pie Sire Cake and ]]n p»ee Rook, lllusirs'ed. 
JOHN II. WOODBl'RY, Dermatologist, 
Consultation free. V25 Weil 4!td M-, N. Y 




BENJAMIN'S KUPTtTHB 
v CUBE TBUSS challenge, the world tf- 
c.i«al it in retaining and perfectly curing 
llxRNia.or RopTtnu. Office, 1 Barclay 
Street, opposite the Astor House. 



A Pitiable Sight 

it is to see nil infant suffering from ihe lack of 
proper food It is entirely nnn o o e aia r y, a.- ■ reliable 
rood can always be obtained; we refer to the Gal' 
Borden Bagle Brand Condensed Milk. Sold by gro- 
cers and dnigKlsti < reiTwhere. 



nC»CNE§S A HEAD NOISES CURED 

l» ■Wavier tLn. il iiiii ' i m .aJ.,11 ■ tl .tJ Mil B rr 

«Jlb« V. Haau,gUII »«j,.V V. Hnur.ikUr,- .rlitt 



Burnett's Cocoaine. 
Burnett's Cocoaine. 
Burnett's Cocoaine. 

tV A compound of Cocoa-nut Oil, Ac, for drafting 
the Hair. For efficacy and agreeablcneaa, it is wltbont 
an equal. 

7i preroU* t he hair from falling of. 

It promotes in healthy and rigorous onoutA, 

It is not greasy or sticky. 

It laurel no disagreeable odor. 

It softens the hair uhen hard and dry. 

It soothes the irritated tealp skin. 

It affords the richest lustre. 

It remains longest in effect. 

It easts fifty cents for a half pint bottle. 




MRo 



MR. 
MR, 
MR, 
MR, 



MR, 
MR, 
MR, 
MR, 



MR, 
MR, 



MR, 
MR, 



MR; 
MR, 
MR, 



MR, 
MR, 
MR, 



MR, 
MR, 



MR, 
MR, 



MR, 



AND MRS, ROBERT ABRAMSON 
5» DOROTHY ALBRIGHT 
AND MRSo JOSEPH To ANTOS 
AND MRSo HENRY R» BECKER 
AND MRSo LEON BERGMAN 
AND MRS, ALEXANDER BOCKAR 
AND MRSo Wo LAWRENCE BONNE! 
AND MRSo ROMAN BORDEN 
AND MRSo JACK BOUCH 
AND MRSo FRANK Wo BOWEN 
AND MRSo CARL Go BUSH, SR» 
AND MRSo FREDERICK To COPE 
AND MRSo WILLIAM Wo CROSS 
AND MRSo ROBERT DANISH 
AND MRSo JACK DAVIDSON 
AND MRSo GENE FELMAN 
AND MRSo BLAINE Wo FIKE 
AND MRSo WENDEL FINCZA 
io REBECCA FINKEL 
AND MRSo Ao FRANKEL 
AND MRS„ NORMAN QELLER 
5o Jo HAROLD QENRICH 
AND MRSo DAVID So QILLON 
AND MRSo HASKELL Ro GORDON 
AND MRSo ROBERT Eo GUNNETT 
AND MRSo Mo Fo HAYES 
AND MRSo JOHN F» HAZELTON 
AND MRSo SAMUEL Go HEBEL 
AND MRS, ELMER Ho HERR 
AND MRSo WILLIAM HOLLANDER 
AND MRS. SAMUEL Ro JONES 
AND MRSo EDWARD Fo KENNEDY 
, AND MRSo JOHN F» KING 
AND MRSo EDWARD L KRAUS 

MRo LEWI£ 



MRo AND MRSo ARTHUR Fo KRENER 

MRo AND MRSo IRVIN Mo LAVER 

MR, AND MRSo CHARLES LAVOIE 

MRo AND MRSo WILLIAM Lo LEFFERTS 

MRo AND MRSo SAM LEVY 

MRo AND MRS, STEPHEN Ao LORENZ, JRo 

MRSo CAROLINE Me GORRY 

MRo AND MRSo DAVID MERRIN 

MRo AND MRSo JAMES Ao MORRISON 

MRo AND MRSo EDWARD MORSE 

MRo AND MRSo JOSEPH Fo PERICONI 

MRo AND MRSo AL PROMISLOFF 

MRo AND MRSo ANTHONY RAKOWSKI 

MRo AND MRSo JOSEPH Ao RITSICK, SR. 

MRSo IRVING ROGOW 

MRo AND MRSo ALBERT ROSENTHAL 

MRo AND MRSo NATHAN SAVITZ 

MRo PAUL SCHONWALD 

MR„ AND MRSo PAUL B» SHARING 

DRo DANIEL SILVERMAN 

DR„ AND MRSo MICHAEL Vo SIVAK, SRo 

MRo AND MRSo LEWIS SOBEL 

JOHN Jo STASIK AND MRSo MARY STASIK 

DRo AND MRSo ALBERT Bo STEWART 

MRo MERVIN Co STOVER 

MRo AND MRSo GEORGE SUSSELMAN 

MRSo PAULETTE TENDLER 

MRo AND MRSo Jo LEONARD TESSLER 

MRo AND MRSo MILTON Bo TINKER 

MRSo ESTHER TRITEL 

MRo AND MRSo NICHOLAS VERNICK 

MRo AND MRSo REUBEN WALLACH 

MR, AND MRSo HERBERT WOLBRANSKY 

MRo AND MRSo AARON ZISSMAN 

Ro ZWIEBEL 




210 



nuts i 



JULES Co ABRAMS, Ph.D. 
MARTIN BARON, M.D. 
GIULIO Jo BARBERO, MoD. 
IVAN Do BARONOFSKY, MoD«, Phol 
HERMAN So BELMONT, M„D. 
HUGH Do BENNETT, M.D. 
AMEDEO BONDI, PhoDo 
Mo JOHN BOYD, PhoDo 
BENJAMIN CALESNICK, M.D. 
CHARLES So CAMERON, M.D. 
ALFRED Jo CATENACCI, M.D. 
KENNETH CHALAL, M.D. 
EUGENE COODLEY, M.D. 
EDWARD Do COPPOLA, M„Do 
Lo ANDRE CORMAN, I.D. 
ROBERT Vo DeSILVERIO, M,D. 
THOMAS Mo DEVLIN, Plhi.O. 
JOSEPH Ro DIPALMA, M.D. 
DANIEL. Fo DOWNING, M.Do 
PAUL Jo FINK, MoDo 
CARL Co FISCHER, I.D. 
RAUL FLEISCHMAJER, M.D. 
JOSEPH Mo QAMBESCIA, M.D. 
PHILIP GERBER, M.D. 
RICHARD Eo GIBBONS, M.D. 
VAN BUREN O. HAMMETT, M.D. 
JOSEPH Eo EMBRIGLIA, M»Do 
PAUL Mo JAMES, JR., M.D. 
ELIZABETH B. KAPLAN, M.D. 
WILLIAM Co KASHATUS, M.D. 
HRATCH KASPARIAN, M.D. 
LEON Ao KAUFFMAN, M.D. 
HERBERT KEAN, M.D. 
MARSHALL KLAVAN, M.Do 
IRENA KOPROWSKA, M.D. 
Eo KARL KOIWAI, M.D. 
WALLACE O. LECHER, M.D. 

CHARLES Co 



JAMES Ho LEE, JR», M.D. 
WILLIAM Mo LEMMON, M»D. 
GEORGE C. LEWIS, JR., M.D. 
WILLIAM LIKOFF, MoD. 
BRUCE v. Mac FADYEN, M.D. 
NICHOLAS D. MAURIELLO, M.D. 
THOMAS F. Mc GARRY, M.Do 
LARRY Mc GOWAN, M.D. 
LEWIS C. MILLS, M.D. 
JOHN Ho MOYER, MoD. 
DONALD A. NAQEL, M.Do 
ALEXANDER NEDWICH, MoD. 
LESLIE NICHOLAS, M,D. 
WILBUR Wo OAKS, JR., M.D. 
AXEL K. OLSEN, M.D. 
GADDO ONESTI, M.D. 
JEWELL L. OSTERHOLM, M.D. 
FREDERICK W. PAIRENT, PhoDo 
NEWLIN F. PAXSON, M.D. 
ALEXANDER Eo PEARCE, M.D. 
DOMENIC J. PONTARELLI, M.D. 
JEANETTE A. REME, M.D. 
MACHTELD E. SANO, M.D. 
DEMETRIUS S. SARIS, MoD. 
VICTOR P. SATINSKY, M.D. 
WELLAND F. SHORT, M.D. 
MARY JANE SHOWERS, Ph.D. 
PETER SIGMAN, M»D 
NEIL L SILVERMAN, M.D. 
LEONARD STANTON, M.S. 
SEYMOUR STEIN, MoD. 
PATRICK Bo STOREY, M.D. 
CHARLES D. SWARTZ, M.D. 
FRANK TROPEA, JR., M.D. 
ALEXANDER W. ULIN, M.D. 
HARRY S. WEAVER, JR., M.D. 
OSCAR R. WEINER, M.D. 
TH, JRo, M.D. 



211 



J 



QIHN Bx MJLOfiwc. 



Of PfNNSTLVANIA 



1720 CHtRRY ST, PHILA 19103 ]L-T^* 

ckwow\ 







Congratulations In 
The Class of 1969 



Jersey Shore Medical Center 
Fitkin Hospital 



NEPTUNE, NEW JERSEY 



Member Council of Teaching Hospitals 
Association of American Medical Colleges 



if 



Compliments ol 



7\\. ^ ljr& JfcsL JoL 



<S€>MPIIIIJI,f , I€i>l 



500 Commerce Drive 
Yeadon, Pa. 19051 



Distributors: 

STANDARD X-RAY EQUIPMENT 

SIEMENS X-RAY EQUIPMENT 



DON 7 FCfKff TO giV£ y(ZMS(LF A 
FINANCIAL CUfOUff FW/Ti TIfl£ TO TIA£ 



Ike (j/ieen Siu.ll ao 
viial io Cood Sound 
FirwunciaX Healih 
mill /toon. /iixwL 
flowing. pieeLy. 

Sio/ie Aome. of ii 
away, fo/i a fuiwie. 
/Le^enveJikwiXL add 
Dividend* iwice a 
iiean. ai ike naieof 
vi% pe/i yeaJuSaving, 
QeAiificaied eann 
rro/ie. 



TV FffmL SAVING 

Loan A/isdociaiijori 



Main Office 202 NonJtk B/wad Si. 

R/ianchieA. •••••• ,Sienion a DuvcU Sid, 

1625 K/addiWAik Ave, 




LI 



' ;.- 



3/ 













3331? Stilus ti) im 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 



'• 




MO. U.S. fAT. If Off. 



1U 






Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 

Community Hospital in Suburban Philadelphia 

30 l Beds 

8 Approved Rotating Internships 

I Approved 2 Year General Practice Resident ies 

Contact Director ot Medical Education 



213 



BEST WISHES TO THE GB&BUiLTES 




:h book stobe 




■SBICJL& SPECIALTIES COMPASS 






Supplies and Equipment for 
Physicians, Hospitals, and Laboratories 






214 






V i / 



Aw 



mp 



W 

W 
Ml 



##: 




215 




COHGRATULiOTGKS, SIMI0R1 



BSPA&T1ESKT m MIGROBIGkOGY 








SU:« 



"Ge£ your facts first, and then yon can distort 'em as you please." 

Mark Twain 



WARM CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GRADUATES 
FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOPHYSICS 



W 










216 






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mi 






o> 




VIEW OK WESSKS. DU PONT DE NEMOURS 4 OO.'S UPFEB MKANI) YWI.NE <;UX POWDER MILLS, NEAR WILMINGTON. DELAWARE V S. A. 



mwM 






j ° 



off o 



aware 



emoriat uivision 



aiming 



at jjivision 



Jigene Tlujiont "Memorial Tfospi, 



217 



IP 4P ■) IK W>Wa ¥ W y S l W § $& W W ll 6 ^ W ^, W "WW • •? ^ W W ^ 



r 



saaafw aosswan 



Pride and Locust Streets 



Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 



k 

m 

m 

T 



Graduate Education at Atlantic City Hospital 

325 Beds 
Emergency Rooms Staffed by Full-Time Physicians 

Emphasis on Acute Illnesses 

Active Ward Service and Out-Patient Department 

15 Internships - Flexible program 

Residency Programs 

Medicine, Surgery, Radiology, Pathology 

Stipends with Full Maintenance 

Interns $5,400 - Residents $6,000 to $7,200 



P 

% 

m 



218 



w 



W 




CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE GRADUATES 



DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS 










P.O. BOX 7316 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19101 



Serving the Medical Profession since 1909 
LABORATORY AND MEDICAL SUPPLIES 

We extend our best wishes for your every success 

Let us continue to serve you with 

Microscopes, Medical Books, Diagnostic Instruments 

and Laboratory Reagents and Supplies in your practice 



RETAIL STORE 

40th and Baltimore Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phone: BAring 2-6020 



LABORATORY SUPPLIES 

165 Perm Street 

Ycaclon. Pa. 

Phone: GRanite 6-9300 



Mail and Phone Orders Promptly Filled 



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M* i 7i . N» KIM t^rX -il J . 



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and 









17«i 



Id! jJrcA Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 7 9 70? 



Manufacturing Pharmacists and Publishers 

A complete line of 

Homeopathic Preparations, Specialties 

Fresh Green Plant Tinctures and Books 

Boericke's Materia Media 



INTERSTaTE 

UNITED ■■■ 



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DAVID S. PERLMAN 

KEYSTONE VENDING COMPANY 
3901 M. STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
PHILADELPHIA PHONE (215) PI 4-7800 
NEW JERSEY PHONE (609) 964-1500 



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BUY • SELL • RENT 



Repair • Re-Upholster • Re-Finish 



6 Floors of Total Service 



203 N. Broad St. LO 4-1880 







49th and Gray Ave. 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

phone: SA 7-0500 



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CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE GRADUATE 



DEPARTMENT 
CUP S XJ H G 3E R1T 




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Wm. B. Kohn 

233 N. 15th St. 
Phila. 19102 




CONGB&TTJL&TIQNS T8 ?HI 
€»«&©!? ATIKG CLASS 

BIPAHTM1RT ©f &KATG1I¥ 



B£S7' WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1969 



from the 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE 






222 






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miss yjAij/y m$m 

and 
since 1888 






Planned Lighting Maintenance Service 

Electrical Contractors and Engineers 

Brand Name Appliani cs 

Television Ski co 
211 North Broad St., Phila. Pa. 










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When dining out becomes a 
special occasion . . . 

The Stratford Garden 

Famous for fine food, gracious 
service and expertly-prepared 
cocktails. Popular prices. Dinner 
music 6:30 to 8:30 PM. 

The Hunt Room 

A quaint English Tavern. Lunch- 
eon, Dinner and After Theater 
Snacks. Sunday liquor service 
1 to 10 PM. 

Brood Street ot Walnut • PE 50700 



compliments of the 



CLINIC \1 1 \BORA TORIES 



and 



SCHOOLS OT MEDICAL I 1 ( 1 1 XOTOC^ 



and 



LABORATORY LRAIMXC. 







500 Beds 

— Rotating Internships with Majors in Medicine and Surgery 

— Approved Residencies in General Surgery, Internal Medicine, 

Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pathology 

— Full-Time Chiefs in Medicine and Surgery 

— Affiliation with Jefferson Medical College and the 

Graduate School of the University of Pennsylvania 

— Excellent Stipend with Full Perquisites 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, WRITE OR CALL 

Michael L. Sheppeck, M.D., Medical Director 
St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, Penna. 18015 



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DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 




"Some acquire good judgement the hard -way. by trial and error at 
particular expense, in all senses, to the patient; others acquire it by 
continuing study of the written word from reliable sources, by associa- 
tion with and observation of those of proved good judgement , and by 
unending constructive criticism of their own work and experience." 

C. W. MAYO 



225 



Dedicated to the continued advancement of health through 
drug research 

McNEIL Laboratories, Inc. 

FORT WASHINGTON. PA 

PHARMACEUTICAL MANUFACTURERS 



(McNEIL) 






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compliments of 

was 

JronoA of 



1619 Spruce St. 

PLiUJelpkia, Pa. 19103 

plone: PE 5-6900 




$&A mi Jm llrM 

f JUlilY PftlSY 



(Country ^tresA Z)airy _Pro<£ucts 
Jffilk ancZ /cs (Sream 



Box 71 
Lansdale, Penna, 

Phone: 855-8201 



1500 Parrisli Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Phone EV 6-1234 



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226 




ZUUKY 8T80IOS 

1007 Market Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107 

Official Class Photographers 

Negatives of portraits appearing 

in this annual are kept on file. 

Photographs may be ordered. 



compliments to 

tfas asanas 



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Affiliation in General Surgery 

with Hahnemann Medical College 

and Hospital 



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CHARLES LENTZ & SONS 




Once upon a time at Random College, there was an aggravexed yearbook staff They had 
huffed, and they had puffed. They had hustled, and th*y had bustled. They had waited for 
delivery with anticimpatience When the booh arrived, they were conflummoxed! 

A bromide or a bore just wouldn't wash any more with the discriminating student body at 
Random So Wm. J. Keller Inc., having a special reputation to uphold in the yearbook field, 
was called in to cut the mustard. 

The Kellerproduced book had a look: "THE LOOK OF THE BOOK " The new annual had 
individual identity, character, and class. It was splendiculous compared to the wipe-outs pro- 
duced for Random by the previous osteocephahc publishers. 

Actually, Keller craves the opportunity to have a hand in producing the posher, more ele- 
gantly stylized books. We get a charge out of doing annuals with soul and substance That's 
because from Norfolk to Minneapolis, Keller is known as the House of Contemporary Creativity 

The Wm. J. Keller firm brings together the grooviest contingent of highly trained craftsmen, 
beautilitanans. and hypo benders. Our preference is to use the finest papers and superlative 
inks. Production is by the Velvatone process, which Keller perfected especially for printing 
yearbooks. 

A unique service plan is customized to individual schools, and the most conscientious gen- 
tlemen of the road in the business are available to aid our yearbook staffs, should problems 
arise. If needed, hocusfocus artists can be provided by Keller to tackle some available light 
photographic assignments 

The end product of this potpourri of service and talent is a superior, polished yearbook. It is 
an annual in which the staff, the school, and, above all, the student body can take justifiable 
pride because of its CONTEMPORARY CREATIVITY. 

Incidentally. Random College told Ad Hoc U about Keller, and both staffs had smooth sailing 
ever after The Keller knight in your area is Robert P. Davine. 






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CONEMAUGH VALLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

JOHNSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 

1968 - HOUSE STAFF - 1969 



I 




William A. Cassidy 
M.D. 





Bruce E. Duke 
M.D. 



Robert W. Fausel Jr. 
M.D. 




Richard W. Gorski 

M.D. 






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Steven P. Griffin 
M.D. 





Harry K. Jeroy 
M.D. 





Judson H. Kimmel 
M.D. 





Eugene R. McNinch 
M.D. 




Robert T. Moll 
M.D. 



Walter J. Nieri 
M.D. 



W. Bryan Staufer 
M.D. 



John H. Zabkar 
M.D. 




The 
Harrisburg 

Polyclinic 

Hospital 



230 



■CMBIIIIBMHHHM 



=The Associate Ed a tor was Robert Shaw, 

=The Sophomore Editor was Constance L, Goldberg. 

=The Freshman Editor was Emory Robinson, 

=The publisher was Wm J„ Keller inc. 

=The official class photographer was Zamsky Studios, 

=The cover was designed by the Dim rand Manufacturing Company, 

=Dr, E° Karl Koiwai 9 Faculty Advisor to the Yearbook, gave 

generously oi his time and effort, 

=Mr, Robert P, Davine, the publisher's representative, took a 

personal, as well as professional interest in Medic 1969* 

=Mr, Bob Johnston contributed his professional talent to the 

photography oi Medic 1969. 

=Miss Marge Carmosin and Mr, Ernest Leiss, Jr, contributed 



^Members oi the Senior Class who worked on the book include 
Drs, Albright, Bouch, Cope, Farber, Fike, Lesnick, Morrison, 
Tendler, Tessler, and Zappacosta, 

=Tender loving care, sympathy, and assistance were provided 
for the Medic 1969 staff by Mrs. Susan R, Savit%, Mr, Robert 
S%alkay, Mrs. Meiina Rose, and Mrs, Ruth Herr, 



Martin H„ Savlt; 
EdItor=In=GhIeif 



Joyce Ao Boekar 
Art Editor 



Photography Editor 

Earfl S Herr 
Business Manager 



231 




but as for me 

3 knoto that mu redeemer Itoeth 

and at the last 

he toll stand upon the earth 

and though ttiorms shall detoour mji flesh 

and mp bones be as dust 

get shall 3 see for mjiself 

and mji eges shall behold him 

and not as a stranger 




THE HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE ANI 



HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA